Tag Archives: Archival Collections

malibu_times

Pepperdine University Libraries digitizes the early years of the Malibu Times

malibu_timesOn May 2, 1946, the inaugural issue of The Malibu Times reported on several items. Locally, a truck driver was sentenced to 90 days in county jail for driving drunk. National news included mention of an electric window shade featured at the World Inventor’s Expo in Chicago. And Judge John L. Webster, a community leader, heralded the newspaper with these words: “With the advent of the first issue of THE MALIBU TIMES, this western beach and mountain section of Los Angeles county is entering upon a new era. The development planned for Malibu will make it one of the finest, if not THE finest, coastal areas along the entire Pacific slope.”

Pepperdine University Libraries are pleased to announce that the first five years of The Malibu Times are now available online and freely accessible through Pepperdine Digital Collections. Spanning the years 1946 to 1950, these early years of Malibu’s longest-running newspaper are now available, for the first time, as full-text searchable documents. Readers have the option to flip through the paper via an online reader, download a complete PDF of an issue, or highlight a particular article for download or printing (article level segmentation). Click here to access the collection.

The Malibu Times, our coastal community’s premier newspaper, includes sections on the community, Malibu life, news, sports, opinion, obituaries, and entertainment. The paper was founded in 1946 by two Malibu couples: Reeves and Eileen Templeman, and William and Marian Macfadyen. The Templemans carried the paper through the decades until Arnold and Karen York bought the newspaper in 1987. The Malibu Times, still going strong, remains under their ownership today.

Pepperdine University Libraries digitized the first five years of the newspaper as part of a pilot program, and we are actively seeking donations to help us digitize the full run of The Malibu Times. We have, in our Special Collections, the only complete run of this historical newspaper, and digitizing the paper and making it fully searchable online would be an invaluable service to the Malibu community. Click here if you would like to make a contribution.

Many thanks and enjoy.

Special Collections and University Archives Celebrates Two Years of Contributing Finding Aids to the OAC

February 2014, marked our second anniversary of contributing finding aids to the Online Archive of California (OAC). We are excited about the fact that in a little over two years we have increased our finding aids from 0 to 120, and we have seen an incremental increase in our visitor usage. While we have a few collections in our growing areas of Film and Television (6 collections) and Politics (3 collections), most of the materials we have processed fall within our 3 main collecting areas:

1. The University Archives (95 collections)

2. The Malibu Historical Collection (10 collections)

3. The Churches of Christ Heritage Center (6 collections)

With the processing of these materials, we have been able to track visitor usage and are pleased to see that more and more people are using our finding aids to access information. During our first month of operation, we had 14 unique visitors look at our finding aids; however, by the end of 2012, we increased to an average of 91 unique visitors per month. By 2013, our numbers jumped to an average of 384, and now, just within the first three months of 2014, we’ve average 425 unique viewers each month.  In addition, usage in the reading room has increased as well.

For any given month, we have been able to monitor such interesting things as what finding aids are most popular, how long researchers spent looking at our finding aids, and what keywords did researchers use to find our materials. Some of the more popular finding aids as of late include the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum Records with 56 views, the Chuck Waters Papers with 46 views, and the Michael D. (Micky) Moore Papers with 37 views.  About 80% of researchers have spent 30 minutes or less looking at a particular finding aid and some popular keywords include “Malibu” and “Pepperdine.”  In addition, we can tell what day is most popular (this month it’s been Sunday) and where researchers reside (32% of our recent viewers reside in Malibu, followed by 20.4% in Houston, and 9.6% in Seattle). Researchers from such countries as China, Ukraine, France, Canada, India, Ireland, and Brazil have looked at our finding aids. Interestingly enough, we can also tell that 1:00 a.m. appears to be a popular search time.

Needless to say, all of this would not be possible without the hard work of our dedicated team. A most sincere thanks to everyone who has participated in the processing of these 120 finding aids. To view our finding aids please click here. If you are interested in learning more about our collections, please contact katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-4323.

Welcome Special Collections and University Archives Interns!

3 interns and 1 volunteer joined the Special Collections and University Archives team this semester. Each student is assigned a unique project that is tailored to their interests, desired learning outcomes, and departmental needs.

Lindsey Sommer is a second year graduate student in the UCLA MLIS program. She is processing the papers of Shirley Roper. Roper served as an assistant to numerous Pepperdine presidents including Benton, Davenport, White, and Young, as well as assistant to Provost Adrian. Roper worked at Pepperdine from 1963 to 2012. Her records play an integral role in documenting the history of Pepperdine through her near 50 years at the university and are a valuable asset to the university archives. In addition to processing the collection, Lindsey will create a finding aid and a MARC record for the collection.

Kendal Copeland is a junior at Pepperdine majoring in History. Kendal will enhance the finding aids of the Pepperdine Associates Records and the Pepperdine University Convocations, Founder’s Day and Presidential Inaugurations Collection. Kendal will describe the collections in greater detail, adding folder level description to Archivists’ Toolkit and updating the finding aids. She will also take part in an important preservation activity to preserve the student newspaper the Graphic.

Sophie Zhu is a junior at Pepperdine majoring in History. Sophie is processing a recent acquisition from Tommie Williams, wife of Hanson Williams, who served as a photographer at Pepperdine College. The new acquisition focuses solely on Williams’ time during the Korean War. Williams took many photos while in the military, stationed in Korea from 1951-1952. She will update the finding aid for this collection, Mylar, and organize the photographs.

Amber DelaCruz is a recent graduate of San Jose State University with a MLIS degree. Amber has worked on several projects including creating a finding aid for the Pepperdine Oral Histories Collection and also updating the Gavin McLeod Collection of Scripts. Currently, she is processing the Pepperdine University Campus Planning and Construction Collection.

Thanks interns and volunteers for all of your hard work!

Interested in interning in Special Collections and University Archives? Contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310)506-4323.

Special Collections Welcomes Three Interns

Special Collections is pleased to host three interns during the fall 2013 semester!

Beth McDonald is a graduate student in the Library and Information Science program at UCLA. During the internship, she will process two of our newest acquisitions the Alan Reed Papers and the Michael D. “Micky” Moore Papers. Reed and Moore were both active in the film and television industry. Reed is best known as the original voice of Fred Flintstone on the show The Flintstones while Moore is probably best known for his work as a second unit director on such projects as the Indiana Jones trilogy, Patton, and The Ten Commandments. The project includes arranging and describing materials, writing a finding aid, adding descriptive information to Archivists’ Toolkit, uploading the finding aids to the Online Archive of California, creating MARC records to add to the library catalog, and assisting the archivist with selecting items for digitization or an upcoming exhibit.

Kendal Copeland is a junior at Pepperdine University majoring in Sports Broadcasting and minoring in History. Kendal will enhance the finding aid of the Pepperdine University Athletics Records. Kendal will describe the collection in greater detail, adding folder level description to Archivists’ Toolkit and updating the finding aid. She will also assist the archivist with selecting items for digitization or an exhibit.

Victoria Collie is a graduate student in the School of Library and Information Science at San Jose State University. She is currently working on the Edwards Metcalf Collection of Books on T.E. Lawrence. Victoria is creating a research guide to the collection, including a biography of Lawrence, an annotated bibliography of selected materials in the collection, and curated lists of research resources on Lawrence. In addition, Victoria will also be doing detailed processing of the related Metcalf Papers and creating an exhibit of materials from the collection.








If you see Beth, Kendal, or Victoria around this fall make sure you say hi!

For further questions about internships or Special Collections and University Archives please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310)506-4323.

Intern Completes Special Collections Project

Alexandra Mogan was one of two Pepperdine students to intern in Special Collections and University Archives during the fall semester.  Mogan was responsible for organizing, describing, and creating a finding aid for the Charles Marowitz collection of the Malibu Stage Company.  Marowitz, a well-known writer, director, and entrepreneur, is also the co-founder of the Malibu Stage Company. The collection Mogan processed includes Marowitz’s files from the period he served as Artistic Director of the company from 1990 to 2002. The finding aid is available here. For further information about viewing the collection or for information on the types of internships available with Special Collections please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu


This is what Mogan had to say about her experience interning in Special Collections and University Archives:

We live in a world spinning with information. While extraordinary, it also makes it difficult to discern what is truly factual. In our quest to discover truth we often turn to the publications of others who have performed the harrowing task of sifting through piles of information for us. Yet some unrelenting minds may still wonder:  where do researchers obtain their information? Where is the starting line for researchers’ race to the truth? The answer is in the Archives, the mecca for all researchers in search for information straight from the source. It is in these archival institutions that the past remains alive. Through careful preservation and processing of collections containing anything from books to photographs to surfboards, archivists prepare the past to answer questions for the future. Part historian, part scientist, part detective, archivists examine and record their findings as they take a journey back into time. With each collection they shadow the lives of the past, watching as history unfolds in front of their eyes. Archives give researchers direct access to primary sources, keeping the truth as pure and untouched as possible. As it was found, it has remained. During my internship at Pepperdine’s archives, I gained insight into this safe house of information. Born with a love for history, I have a natural hunger for information. Be it a book, a program on the History Channel or a historical marker on the side of the highway, I enjoy gathering information. As a student of History, I have learned to become critical of the information presented to me. Is it biased? Is it well-researched? Where have the facts come from? Flipping to the back of the book and looking at the cited works can only do so much. Through my internship I have discovered that archives make the past tangible; it brings the scholar face-to-face with his research. In the archives, the past has not been analyzed and put into a historian’s words; the information remains there, pure and untouched. It has been interesting being a part of the behind-the-scenes work before sources are made available to the researchers. To be an archivist is not simply to be a good processor and organizer. To be an archivist is to be the constructor of the foundation from which truth will be built upon.

Mogan working on her collection.