Tag Archives: cold war

New Cold War era Herschensohn film online: Today’s featured digital object

Where were you at 5:02? May 18th, 1965, that is. Attending a Hindu wedding in New Delhi? Riding a roller coaster in Mexico City? Serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in Rio de Janeiro? Or perhaps being born in San Diego? These are just some of the events captured by the film Eulogy to 5:02, written and produced by Bruce Herschensohn for the United States Information Agency in 1965. Narrated by Richard Burton, the 27-minute film presents twenty segments—each one-minute long—depicting a “minute lived in freedom” in twenty locations around the world. That minute? 5:02 Greenwich Mean Time on May 18th, 1965.

Filmmaker Bruce Herschensohn in 1965

It was a minute of no particular importance, but, as the opening narration tells us, “for the two-thirds of the world who lived in freedom on May the 18th, 5:02 was significant, for it was another minute spent in doing what they chose to do. Though their freedom went on as unnoticed as the time, 5:02 was theirs, to work if they wanted to work, to dream if they wanted to dream, to live as they wanted to live.”

Although clearly crafted for an explicit purpose at the height of the Cold War, Eulogy to 5:02 presents the viewer with a remarkable, multinational time capsule depicting life on Earth nearly 50 years ago. Tahitian women wash clothes on the beach as the sun rises; Arab construction workers build high-rise apartments in the planned-city of Ashdod, Israel; and youngsters play children’s games on the streets of Copenhagen, Denmark. A little closer to home, a salesman maneuvers his convertible through the labyrinthine freeway system of Los Angeles, where it is 9:02 AM (the lack of traffic congestion would startle today’s commuter). All scenes are scored with Herschensohn’s lively and dramatic music.

At least as interesting as the film itself is the story behind its creation. This story plays out in the digitized scripts, production notes, and correspondence of the Bruce Herschensohn Collection. Coordinating the simultaneous filming of twenty sequences in twenty global locations is a significant task—as is fudging the truth when circumstances don’t quite work out. Piecing this story together reveals as much about history and politics as it does about making movies.

Storyboard and still from "Eulogy to 5:02" refugee sequence

For example, the concluding one-minute segment of the film depicts the arrival of refugees to free soil. Herschensohn originally scripted the sequence with mainland Chinese seeking refuge in Hong Kong, but circumstances required the relocation of the scene to Vietnam. His instructions to the local film crew (employed by the USIA) included the following: “This is one of our main propaganda sequences and needs to come off with a real feeling of compassion. The family or families need to evoke a real empathy from the audience and no corn. The faces should be great old wrinkled faces as well as unknowing youth…” On May 24th, 1965, Ed Hunter of the USIA film crew in Saigon wrote to Herschensohn with news of the successful, although arduous night of filming. “I risked my life, got soaked to the skin, and was arrested four times during the shooting, if you like the footage and can’t pay, send a present.” The night before the film shoot, he explains, Vietcong disguised as Marines attacked an outpost only a quarter of a mile from the location. Hunter also references the bombing of the US embassy less than two months earlier, which his crew also documented. “Ghastly. Truly ghastly.” He writes of the embassy: “We now have safety glass in our office windows, and they have bricked up the library downstairs. Come back to Saigon…”

See the results for yourself. Click here to watch Eulogy to 5:02 in its entirety and then explore the materials related to the film in the Bruce Herschensohn Collection. Enjoy.

Herschensohn’s Eulogy to 5:02: Today’s featured digital object

Pepperdine students today may know Bruce Herschensohn for his memorable appearances as a senior fellow with the School of Public Policy. Others may recall his political commentary in the media, his roles in the Nixon and Reagan administrations, or his California Senate campaigns of 1986 and 1992. However, few may know that he got his start as an award-winning documentary filmmaker.

Artwork for film "Eulogy to 5:02"

Herschensohn made numerous films for the United States Information Agency (USIA), becoming that agency’s Director of Motion Pictures and Television in 1968. Production materials related to many of these films, including scripts, storyboards, notes, correspondence, and artwork—and many of the films themselves—await discovery in our Bruce Herschensohn Collection. This online collection is an ever-growing digital surrogate for the complete Bruce Herschensohn Papers, which are among the holdings of our Special Collections and University Archives department.

In 1965, Herschensohn had the unique idea to make a film about twenty simultaneous stories going on all over the world during the course of a single minute (5:02 PM Greenwich) on an unspecified day. Each segment from locations such as London, Copenhagen, Karachi, New Delhi, Hong Kong, San Juan, Rio de Janeiro, New Orleans, Los Angeles, and Lagos, lasts one minute. The theme, according to Herschensohn, was to demonstrate that “we all have in common the fact that we’re alive NOW and share this common time in the world’s history.” Produced, as it was, by the USIA, the film was also designed to show how US policies were positively impacting the lives of ordinary people around the world.

Click here to browse the Herschensohn material related to Eulogy to 5:02.