Tag Archives: history

New for 2015 in Project Muse

The following journals, previously announced as joining Project MUSE, are now online:

** From the Liverpool University Press:  European Journal of Language Policy

Published by Liverpool University Press, in association with the Conseil europen pour les langues/European Language Council, the journal aims to address major developments in language policy from a European perspective, regarding multilingualism and the diversity of languages as valuable assets in the culture, politics and economics of twenty-first century societies.

** From the Duke University Press:  Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture

The Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture publishes research on premodern Chinese literature and all aspects of the broader literary culture. It also explores the influence of traditional literature and culture in modern and contemporary China. Jointly sponsored by Peking University and the University of Illinois, the journal is committed to an international editorial vision and to in-depth exchange and collaboration among scholars in China, the U.S., and around the world.

** From the University of Nebraska Press:   Middle West Review

The Middle West Review is an interdisciplinary journal about the American Midwest and the only publication dedicated exclusively to the study of the Midwest as a region. It provides a forum for scholars and nonscholars alike to explore the contested meanings of Midwestern identity, history, geography, society, culture, and politics.

 

New Exhibit Images of the Korean War: One Soldier’s Perspective Opens this Month at Payson Library

Williams (right) on the front 1952

Hanson (right) on the front, 1952.

Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce a new exhibition highlighting the Korean War photos taken by Hanson Williams Jr., a 1950 graduate of Pepperdine, who received a photography scholarship to attend the university. Six months after his graduation, he was drafted by the United States Army and was stationed in California for one year before being deployed to Korea to serve as a war photographer. In this capacity, he often photographed soldiers in combat, special events, and visiting dignitaries such as generals, politicians, and celebrities. Williams recalled carrying his personal camera with him every day, and even resorted to developing film in rivers and rice paddies when necessary. In addition to his military duties, Williams tried to get a better understanding of the country and its people. He would spend his spare time riding his bike into remote locations and photograph such things as local villagers and their farms. Williams spent 13 months in Korea traveling to cities such as Seoul, Incheon, and Taegu.

Korean man 1952

A photo Hanson took while in Korea, 1952.

The exhibit serves as Williams’s visual diary showing his journey from basic training at Fort Ord in Monterey, CA to his time served in Korea. Many of the photos taken by Williams during his spare time in remote villages have never been exhibited before. The materials will be on display on the first floor of Payson Library until April 15th . The exhibit is viewable during library open hours. For questions about the exhibit please contact Katie Richardson, Archivist for Special Collections and University Archives, at 310-506-4323 or katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu.

 A reception for the exhibit will take on February 21st from 12-2. If you are interested in attending the event, please RSVP to Jeanette Woodburn, Director of Library Advancement at 310-506-6785 or Jeanette.Woodburn@pepperdine.edu.

Special thanks to Special Collections and University Archives interns and student workers Emily Hansen, Sophie Zhu, and Candice Erdos for all of their help preparing for this exhibit.

Emily prepping

Emily prepping for the exhibit.

case2candice

Candice assisting with exhibit installation.

 

 

Pepperdine’s Fight against Communism: Announcing the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum digital collection

Freedom Forum luncheon in the Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles, 1960

Freedom Forum luncheon in the Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles, 1960

The Pepperdine College Freedom Forum was an annual, three-day seminar designed to promote American values as a defense against communism, held in Los Angeles between 1959 and 1971. The model for the Freedom Forum grew out of the National Education Program developed by George S. Benson, President of Harding College. At Pepperdine, President M. Norvel Young carried the idea forward, where it was sometimes referred to as the California Freedom Forum. The Freedom Forum was part of a larger constellation of anti-communist activities at Pepperdine College, which included a weekly Speaker’s Bureau, an anti-communist film series, and various citizen education and teacher training programs.

Billed as a “seminar to prepare leadership for American resistance to the spread of Communism and Socialism,” the inaugural Freedom Forum in 1959 featured talks such as “Communism’s Invisible Weapon—Brainwashing” and “What Socialism Has Delivered in Europe.” The featured speaker that first year was Senator John L. McClellan, who delivered the keynote “Can American Freedom Survive?” before a packed house of 800 California business leaders in the ballroom of the Biltmore Hotel.

Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce that hundreds of program booklets, typed speeches, photographs, newspaper clippings, and interviews from all thirteen years of the Freedom Forum are now available to researchers and the interested public through the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum digital collection. This collection is a digitized subset of the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum Records available for research in our Special Collections and University Archives located in Payson Library on the Malibu campus.

Richard Arens of the House Committe on Un-American Activities speaking at the 1959 Freedom Forum

Richard Arens of the House Committe on Un-American Activities speaking at the 1959 Freedom Forum

Program cover featuring Senator Barry Goldwater, 1961

Program cover featuring Senator Barry Goldwater, 1961

Don McCulloch presenting on Communism and brainwashing at the 1959 Freedom Forum

Don McCulloch presenting on Communism and brainwashing at the 1959 Freedom Forum

New Malibu matchbook and postcard collection online

Lighthouse cafe matchcoverAccording to the New York Times, “Close Cover Before Striking” is the most printed phrase in the history of the printed word. Perhaps you remember the days when every business, it seemed, advertised its services via free matchbooks bearing a logo, address, and phone number. Matchbook cover advertising rose and fell with the popularity of cigarette smoking, and was all but obliterated by the advent of the cheap, disposable Bic lighter in the early 1970s. Although customized matchboxes have made a bit of a comeback recently (think high-end restaurants), the heyday for the matchbook cover remains in the past, charting a visual history of midcentury American culture and commerce.

Pepperdine University Libraries are pleased to announce the Eric Wienberg Collection of Malibu Matchbooks and Postcards, the latest addition to the Pepperdine Digital Collections. This online collection includes over forty matchbook covers that chronicle the history of business establishments and sites in Malibu and the surrounding area. The collection covers a period between the 1930s and the 1980s, and features matchbook covers from restaurants, cafes, bars, hotels, motels, stores, and other businesses from Malibu, Topanga, Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica, Culver City, and Venice Beach. The matchbooks and postcards were collected and generously donated by former Malibu resident Eric Wienberg.

The digital collection allows users to view both sides of the matchbook cover, either individually or side-by-side. Many businesses used the underside of the cover for hidden images or jokes, in addition to further details about their services (see below). The user can also see the matchbook cover on a map showing the business’ original location, or take a west to east tour of these historical businesses along the Pacific Coast Highway via the Library’s Historypin.com channel.

Return to a time when Alice’s Restaurant graced the Malibu Pier, when Duke’s Malibu was known as the Las Flores Inn, when lovers rendezvoused at the Albatross Hotel, and when Pacific Palisades had the Lighthouse café (and a working lighthouse). Enjoy.

Underside of Malibu Beach Motor Inn match cover

Underside of Malibu Beach Motor Inn match cover

Screenshot of matchbook covers in Historypin.com tour

Screenshot of matchbook covers in Historypin.com tour

malibu_times

Pepperdine University Libraries digitizes the early years of the Malibu Times

malibu_timesOn May 2, 1946, the inaugural issue of The Malibu Times reported on several items. Locally, a truck driver was sentenced to 90 days in county jail for driving drunk. National news included mention of an electric window shade featured at the World Inventor’s Expo in Chicago. And Judge John L. Webster, a community leader, heralded the newspaper with these words: “With the advent of the first issue of THE MALIBU TIMES, this western beach and mountain section of Los Angeles county is entering upon a new era. The development planned for Malibu will make it one of the finest, if not THE finest, coastal areas along the entire Pacific slope.”

Pepperdine University Libraries are pleased to announce that the first five years of The Malibu Times are now available online and freely accessible through Pepperdine Digital Collections. Spanning the years 1946 to 1950, these early years of Malibu’s longest-running newspaper are now available, for the first time, as full-text searchable documents. Readers have the option to flip through the paper via an online reader, download a complete PDF of an issue, or highlight a particular article for download or printing (article level segmentation). Click here to access the collection.

The Malibu Times, our coastal community’s premier newspaper, includes sections on the community, Malibu life, news, sports, opinion, obituaries, and entertainment. The paper was founded in 1946 by two Malibu couples: Reeves and Eileen Templeman, and William and Marian Macfadyen. The Templemans carried the paper through the decades until Arnold and Karen York bought the newspaper in 1987. The Malibu Times, still going strong, remains under their ownership today.

Pepperdine University Libraries digitized the first five years of the newspaper as part of a pilot program, and we are actively seeking donations to help us digitize the full run of The Malibu Times. We have, in our Special Collections, the only complete run of this historical newspaper, and digitizing the paper and making it fully searchable online would be an invaluable service to the Malibu community. Click here if you would like to make a contribution.

Many thanks and enjoy.

Introducing the Alumni Memories digital collection

Bernice Pitts receiving her degree at GPC from President Tiner

Bernice Pitts receiving her degree at GPC from President Tiner

Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce the launch of the Alumni Memories Collection, a new digital collection designed to honor the lives of our alumni and the special bond they’ve formed with Pepperdine University. The collection, freely accessible online, is composed of photographs, memorabilia, documents, scrapbooks, correspondence, and other materials donated to Pepperdine University Libraries by alumni of George Pepperdine College and Pepperdine University. The items in this collection, arranged by theme or donor, strive to capture the “Pepperdine experience” while providing a glimpse into the lives of the men and women that call Pepperdine their alma mater.

Christmas Card sent to the Pitts from M. Norvel Young and Family

Christmas Card sent to the Pitts from M. Norvel Young and Family

The flagship donation for the Alumni Memories Collection comes to us from Bernice M. (Carr) Pitts (’49), who provides numerous photographs and documents related to the life she shared with her husband, Carroll Pitts, Jr. (’54). Bernice and Carroll were the first African-American students to live in Normandie Village, the married student housing complex on the original Los Angeles campus of George Pepperdine College. In addition to photos of campus, the collection includes photos and clippings related to the Pitts family, Churches of Christ history in Southern California, and the Pitts’ ongoing relationship with fellow GPC alumnus Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn.

Bernice and Carroll Pitts receive a commemorative certificate from L.A. County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn in 1982

Bernice and Carroll Pitts receive a commemorative certificate from L.A. County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn in 1982

Carroll Pitts, Jr. also earned an M.A. in Religion from Pepperdine College in 1969, producing his thesis A Critical Study of Civil Rights Practices, Attitudes and Responsibilities in Churches of Christ. Throughout his career, Carroll specialized in church administration and personal evangelism, serving as the Minister of the Normandie Church of Christ in Los Angeles for over two decades. Carroll and Bernice traveled widely in support of Christian education, conducting workshops and gospel meetings in places as diverse as South Africa, Egypt, Rome, London, and Haiti. Carroll also taught classes at the annual Pepperdine Bible Lectures in addition to teaching part-time in Pepperdine University’s Religion Division. He passed in 1987. We are very grateful to Bernice for this donation, which we hope will honor his memory and celebrate the achievements they made together through a life devoted to God and Christian education.

If you are an alumnus interested in donating materials to this collection, please contact our Archivist, Katie Richardson at (310) 506-4323 or Katie.Richardson@pepperdine.edu.

T.E. Lawrence Exhibit Opens in Payson Library

This blog post was written by Victoria Collie, Special Collections and University Archives Intern.

An exhibit highlighting the Metcalf Collection of Books on T.E. Lawrence is now open on the main level of Payson Library. Housed in the Special Collections and University Archives, this is the first lawrence bk collectiontime the books have been on display. The book collection and associated Metcalf papers were donated to Pepperdine by Edwards H. Metcalf (1911-2001), a Pepperdine University board member and grandson of millionaire Henry Edwards Huntington. Metcalf was a T.E. Lawrence enthusiast, and helped plan Pepperdine’s T.E. Lawrence Symposium in 1988. The book collection alone contains over 400 books on Lawrence and the Middle East. If you would like to learn more about T.E. Lawrence and the book collection, check out the new InfoGuide! It provides a good starting place for research.

from With Lawrence in Arabia

T.E. Lawrence, 1919
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:With_Lawrence_in_Arabia.jpg

T.E. Lawrence, or “Lawrence of Arabia,” was an extremely intelligent and complex person, who seemed restless until he found his calling in the Middle East fighting alongside the Arab leaders during the Arab Revolt of 1916-1918. He had been familiar with the region before, taking several trips to the area and becoming used to the language and the Arab way of life. His use of guerrilla activities against the Turks during the revolt gained him sudden notoriety. After the war, he ran from his new found fame, using assumed names when enlisting in the Royal Air Force. He died in 1935 at the age of 46. Lawrence wrote a variety of works, including Seven Pillars of Wisdom, which is on display. Also included in the exhibit is his college thesis, Crusader Castles (1936). There are many controversies surrounding Lawrence’s career and life, but he will continue to be the subject of admiration and speculation for years to come.

amman aerodome 1921

Sir Herbert Samuel is pictured in the white hat; Lawrence is pictured to the left of him, and Emir Abdullah is seen on the right. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-DIG-ppmsca-19413

Pepperdine Honors 50th Anniversary of JFK’s Death with Screening and Exhibit

Herschensohn Exhibit Poster jpgOn Friday, November 22nd, from 2-4:30pm, fifty years to the day following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Pepperdine University Libraries and the School of Public Policy will host a screening of John F. Kennedy: Years of Lightning, Day of Drums, with director Bruce Herschensohn.

During the entire month of November, a complementary exhibit will be held in Payson Library that explores the making of this film with photographs, correspondence, posters, memorabilia, and other images.

The 90-minute film, produced by the United States Information Agency (USIA) and written and directed by Herschensohn, examined the life, death, and impact of John F. Kennedy shortly after his assassination. It features extensive excerpts from Kennedy’s speeches, including color footage of his swearing in and inaugural address. Gregory Peck served as the narrator of the film, and it was ultimately shown in more than 100 countries and in 30 languages. The USIA produced media about American for foreign audiences. Because audiences were so moved by this film, a special act of Congress in 1965 allowed it to be distributed in the U.S. for viewing by domestic audiences.

The film screening at Pepperdine will be followed by a Q&A with writer and director, Bruce Herschensohn. The event is free and open to the public.

The exhibit, which will be on display in Payson Library throughout the month of November, features materials from the Bruce Herschsensohn Papers about the making of John F. Kennedy: Years of Lightning, Day of Drums. These materials document the filming of the worldwide reaction to Kennedy’s death, including the funeral proceedings in Washington, D.C., and memorial services around the world; the development of the film script and music; the worldwide release and international acclaim of the film; and the distribution within the U.S. Related materials can be found in the Pepperdine Digital Collections.

The materials in the exhibit are taken from the Bruce Herschensohn Papers, which are held by Pepperdine University’s Special Collections and University Archives, where they are available for research. Digital images from the collection are also available online in the Pepperdine Digital Collections. The collection includes items collected and created by Herschensohn as an independent filmmaker, a Director of Motion Pictures and Television at the United States Information Agency (USIA), a member of staff at the White House for Presidents Nixon and Reagan, and a political commentator for the KABC television and radio stations. Materials include correspondence, photographs, video and audio recordings, manuscripts, musical compositions, drawings, newspaper clippings, and other items related to the development of his films.

Bruce Herschensohn is a political commentator, author and senior fellow at the Pepperdine University School of Public Policy in Malibu, California.  He served in the Nixon and Reagan administrations and is the author of nine books, in addition to being a filmmaker and producer.

Please contact Melissa Nykanen at (310) 506-4434 or at melissa.nykanen@pepperdine.edu for questions about the screening or exhibit.

Premiere of the film in Karachi, Pakistan, November 25, 1964.

Premiere of the film in Karachi, Pakistan, November 25, 1964.

A poster from the U.S. distribution of the film.

A poster from the U.S. distribution of the film.

Guess who’s turning 40? Stauffer Chapel (slideshow)

Stauffer ChapelPepperdine University’s own “little chapel on the hill” turns 40 years old today. Stauffer Chapel was dedicated on November 4, 1973 about one year after Pepperdine’s Malibu campus opened its doors. Named for longtime Pepperdine supporter Beverly Stauffer, the chapel stands at the southern edge of campus overlooking the wide vista of the Pacific Ocean. Encased by 3,000 square feet of stained glass, Stauffer Chapel is the spiritual heart of campus, providing a sanctuary for worship, prayer, song, or quiet reflection.

Our chapel has played this role now for four decades. To mark this milestone, we’ve assembled a brief slideshow of archival photos from Stauffer Chapel’s history. All of these images can also be found in the Pepperdine Digital Collections. Enjoy.

Happy World Day for Audiovisual Heritage!

Here’s something that you may not have known: this Sunday, October 27th, is World Day for Audiovisual Heritage. And why should you care? While you may be hard pressed to find a Happy World Day for Audiovisual Heritage card at the Hallmark store, it speaks to a very important issue. Experts estimate that we have only 10 to 15 years left to digitize the wealth of content on analog audiovisual media—such as film, reel-to-reel tape, and even VHS—dating to the mid to late 20th century. This material constitutes an indispensable complement to the written record of our collective world history, and it is at risk of permanent loss due to the vulnerability of these media to decay, damage, and playback obsolescence.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) launched the World Day for Audiovisual Heritage in 2005 in order to acknowledge the importance of audiovisual recordings and raise general awareness of the need for urgent measures to be taken to preserve them.

Pepperdine University Libraries has responded to this charge by partnering with the California Audiovisual Preservation Project, an initiative of the California Preservation Program that provides digitization and access services for historic California audiovisual recordings. So far, more than two dozen films, reel-to-reel tapes, and other vulnerable recordings in our Special Collections and University Archives have been digitized for preservation purposes through this collaboration. These recordings, such as this recently digitized speech by Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor at the 1985 Pepperdine Law School Dinner, are now available in our Pepperdine Digital Collections.

Please visit the links above to discover how you can contribute to the preservation of the world’s audiovisual heritage.