Tag Archives: malibu

New Malibu matchbook and postcard collection online

Lighthouse cafe matchcoverAccording to the New York Times, “Close Cover Before Striking” is the most printed phrase in the history of the printed word. Perhaps you remember the days when every business, it seemed, advertised its services via free matchbooks bearing a logo, address, and phone number. Matchbook cover advertising rose and fell with the popularity of cigarette smoking, and was all but obliterated by the advent of the cheap, disposable Bic lighter in the early 1970s. Although customized matchboxes have made a bit of a comeback recently (think high-end restaurants), the heyday for the matchbook cover remains in the past, charting a visual history of midcentury American culture and commerce.

Pepperdine University Libraries are pleased to announce the Eric Wienberg Collection of Malibu Matchbooks and Postcards, the latest addition to the Pepperdine Digital Collections. This online collection includes over forty matchbook covers that chronicle the history of business establishments and sites in Malibu and the surrounding area. The collection covers a period between the 1930s and the 1980s, and features matchbook covers from restaurants, cafes, bars, hotels, motels, stores, and other businesses from Malibu, Topanga, Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica, Culver City, and Venice Beach. The matchbooks and postcards were collected and generously donated by former Malibu resident Eric Wienberg.

The digital collection allows users to view both sides of the matchbook cover, either individually or side-by-side. Many businesses used the underside of the cover for hidden images or jokes, in addition to further details about their services (see below). The user can also see the matchbook cover on a map showing the business’ original location, or take a west to east tour of these historical businesses along the Pacific Coast Highway via the Library’s Historypin.com channel.

Return to a time when Alice’s Restaurant graced the Malibu Pier, when Duke’s Malibu was known as the Las Flores Inn, when lovers rendezvoused at the Albatross Hotel, and when Pacific Palisades had the Lighthouse café (and a working lighthouse). Enjoy.

Underside of Malibu Beach Motor Inn match cover

Underside of Malibu Beach Motor Inn match cover

Screenshot of matchbook covers in Historypin.com tour

Screenshot of matchbook covers in Historypin.com tour

malibu_times

Pepperdine University Libraries digitizes the early years of the Malibu Times

malibu_timesOn May 2, 1946, the inaugural issue of The Malibu Times reported on several items. Locally, a truck driver was sentenced to 90 days in county jail for driving drunk. National news included mention of an electric window shade featured at the World Inventor’s Expo in Chicago. And Judge John L. Webster, a community leader, heralded the newspaper with these words: “With the advent of the first issue of THE MALIBU TIMES, this western beach and mountain section of Los Angeles county is entering upon a new era. The development planned for Malibu will make it one of the finest, if not THE finest, coastal areas along the entire Pacific slope.”

Pepperdine University Libraries are pleased to announce that the first five years of The Malibu Times are now available online and freely accessible through Pepperdine Digital Collections. Spanning the years 1946 to 1950, these early years of Malibu’s longest-running newspaper are now available, for the first time, as full-text searchable documents. Readers have the option to flip through the paper via an online reader, download a complete PDF of an issue, or highlight a particular article for download or printing (article level segmentation). Click here to access the collection.

The Malibu Times, our coastal community’s premier newspaper, includes sections on the community, Malibu life, news, sports, opinion, obituaries, and entertainment. The paper was founded in 1946 by two Malibu couples: Reeves and Eileen Templeman, and William and Marian Macfadyen. The Templemans carried the paper through the decades until Arnold and Karen York bought the newspaper in 1987. The Malibu Times, still going strong, remains under their ownership today.

Pepperdine University Libraries digitized the first five years of the newspaper as part of a pilot program, and we are actively seeking donations to help us digitize the full run of The Malibu Times. We have, in our Special Collections, the only complete run of this historical newspaper, and digitizing the paper and making it fully searchable online would be an invaluable service to the Malibu community. Click here if you would like to make a contribution.

Many thanks and enjoy.

Guess who’s turning 40? Stauffer Chapel (slideshow)

Stauffer ChapelPepperdine University’s own “little chapel on the hill” turns 40 years old today. Stauffer Chapel was dedicated on November 4, 1973 about one year after Pepperdine’s Malibu campus opened its doors. Named for longtime Pepperdine supporter Beverly Stauffer, the chapel stands at the southern edge of campus overlooking the wide vista of the Pacific Ocean. Encased by 3,000 square feet of stained glass, Stauffer Chapel is the spiritual heart of campus, providing a sanctuary for worship, prayer, song, or quiet reflection.

Our chapel has played this role now for four decades. To mark this milestone, we’ve assembled a brief slideshow of archival photos from Stauffer Chapel’s history. All of these images can also be found in the Pepperdine Digital Collections. Enjoy.

Pepperdine Digital Collections launches the Malibu Historical Photograph Collection

The Malibu Historical Photograph Collection is now available online through Pepperdine Digital Collections. Designed for historians, students, Malibuites, or anyone interested in the visual history of our seaside community, the Malibu Historical Photograph Collection includes images of Malibu people, places, and things dating back to 1890. Each photograph has been scanned and uploaded at a high resolution to allow detailed in-browser zooming with options to download. Furthermore, users can identify a photo’s original vantage point on Google Maps through historypin.com; you can even compare historical photos with today’s Google Street View, when available (hint: move the “Fade” switch back and forth).

Pepperdine University Libraries is very grateful to Lani Netter, whose donation of historical prints served as the seed for the Malibu Historical Photograph Collection. And keep your eyes on this collection—it will grow fast as we digitize our vast archive of historical photographs donated to Pepperdine University by The Malibu Times. Enjoy.

When the President came to Pepperdine: Today’s featured digital object

President Gerald Ford (right) greets actor John Wayne, with benefactor Richard Seaver (center)

On Founder’s Day, September 20, 1975, as Pepperdine University’s Malibu campus began its fourth year of activity, the university was honored by an official visit from the President of the United States, Gerald R. Ford. This was the first time a sitting President had visited Pepperdine, a milestone indicative of both the prestige the university had gained nationally and the ties its administration held with the Republican Party. The day was marked by two building dedications on the rapidly growing campus, both of which featured remarks by President Ford. A VIP brunch ceremony dedicated the Brock House, home to the university president, and this was followed by a public gathering of over 18,000 attendees to witness the dedication of the Firestone Fieldhouse, the campus’ athletics facility. Newly discovered and digitized, the audio recording of President Ford’s dedication of the Firestone Fieldhouse is now available online in our Historic Sound Recordings collection.

The 18,000 strong crowd at the Firestone Fieldhouse dedication, 1975

In addition to a twenty-minute speech by President Ford (on the important role of independent universities and free enterprise in the national education system), the recording also features the pomp and ritual particular to that era, including Pat Boone singing the national anthem and John Wayne leading a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance.

Although it may not be apparent in this recording, President Ford’s visit to Pepperdine occurred during a period of heightened anxiety for both the president and the university. Just two weeks earlier, Squeaky Fromme, a follower of Charles Manson, had attempted to assassinate President Ford in Sacramento (the gun failed to discharge). Security at Pepperdine was intense and there were no incidents; however, just two days later, Sara Jane Moore fired on the president in San Francisco in a second failed attempt. Meanwhile, four days before President Ford was to arrive at Pepperdine, M. Norvel Young, Chancellor of Pepperdine University, crashed his car into another vehicle on the Pacific Coast Highway, causing the death of two motorists. The shadow of this tragedy nearly derailed the Presidential visit, but the event continued as planned.

In addition to listening to the recording, you can also view photographs of the day’s events. Enjoy.

Introducing Historypin: Putting Pepperdine history on the map



Search for historic photos near you with the Historypin mobile app


Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce the launch of its new channel with Historypin.com, a website and mobile application that allows the pinning of historical photographs, audio recordings, and moving image files to Google Maps. Would you like to see the Malibu hills in 1969 before the arrival of Pepperdine University, overlaid seamlessly with the current Google street view? Or perhaps you’d like to take a drive across the newly opened San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge in 1940? You can do all of these things—and more—in our new, interactive Historypin.com channel.

Historypin.com, developed by the nonprofit We Are What We Do in partnership with Google Maps, facilitates social mapping, in which individuals or institutions create a visual history of a particular spot on Earth through pinning digitized photographs (or other media) along with the stories that contextualize and enrich the history behind the images. Historypin calls this “fourth dimensional mapping,” a phenomenon that enables new ways for users to interact with historical photographs. For example, when you visit the Historypin website or mobile application, you can view the image, compare it with the current Google street view (when available), add your own stories to the image feed, use your smart phone to take a “Historypin Repeat” of the same scene, or link to the original image in our digital collections. In addition to searching or browsing images via the map, you can interact with materials in thematic collections or go on virtual walking tours.

Pepperdine University Libraries is utilizing Historypin to further the twin goals of its Special Collections and University Archives department: to preserve and disseminate the history of Pepperdine University and serve as the primary historical repository for the Malibu community. In addition to creating our own Historypin collections and tours, we are leveraging the unique strengths of Historypin to foster collaborations with other university departments and make new inroads into the Malibu community.



Student life 25 years ago today: Today’s featured digital object

In February of 1988, Pepperdine University’s alumni newspaper, The Pepperdine Voice, featured a photo spread titled “A Day in the Life of Pepperdine University.” The introductory text read:

“On Thursday, Jan. 7, 1988, seven photographers were deployed to scour all areas of campus to capture the daily activities of Pepperdine on film…What sort of day was Jan. 7? It was an ordinary day in Pepperdine life, and that is why it was chosen—to show the miracle of the mundane—students, faculty and staff at work, at play, in solitude and in action.”

The original prints and negatives produced for this project are now housed in our University Archives and were recently scanned for the University Archives Photograph (digital) Collection. Continuing our celebration of 40 years in Malibu, I encourage you to view this photographic time capsule of student life in the ‘80s. Technology and fashion may have changed, but I think you’ll agree that the “Waves spirit” captured in these photos is timeless.

View the slideshow, or explore these photos in our digital collections.

Happy New Year!

1971—Construction commences in Malibu: Today’s featured digital object

Continuing our series on the historical events that shaped Pepperdine University in Malibu—in honor of the Malibu campus’ 40th anniversary—we arrive at April 13, 1971. On this overcast, unusually chilly day, approximately 500 Pepperdine supporters gathered on the freshly leveled dirt building pads of the new Malibu campus to observe ceremonies initiating construction of the campus buildings. Billed as the “Ceremony to Commence Construction of Academic Complex on Pepperdine University’s Malibu campus,” the event saw the dedication of three core buildings: Payson Library, the Pendleton Learning Center, and the Huntsinger Academic Center.

The namesakes of these buildings were on hand to make remarks, and President William S. Banowsky spoke about Pepperdine’s educational philosophy, but the real attraction of the day was the keynote address by Wernher von Braun, Deputy Associate Administrator of NASA. Von Braun, a German rocket engineer brought into the fold of the US government following World War II, was one of the leading scientists behind the Apollo moon mission. His prominence following the first moon landing in 1969 contributed to the phrase “it’s not rocket science” to describe a simple task.

His appearance at the Commencement of Construction ceremony—less than two years after the moon landing—provided Pepperdine University with the perfect symbol of education, innovation, and achievement. It was an auspicious start to the buildings that now form the heart of Pepperdine University’s Seaver College in Malibu.

In our Pepperdine Digital Collections, you can listen to a recording of the speeches made that day, including the address by von Braun (he appears on Part 2 of the recording). You can also view a few of the archival photographs of the event. Enjoy.

Governor Reagan and Pepperdine’s Malibu “birth”: Today’s featured digital object

Bill Banowsky and Ronald Reagan with Pereira's sketch of Malibu campus, 1970

With the 40th anniversary of Pepperdine University in Malibu upon us, this entry is the first in a series dedicated to the historic events and hardworking individuals that made the vision of Pepperdine in Malibu a reality and shaped its presence in this seaside community. We begin with a “birth.” Nearly two years before construction crews laid the 40-foot-deep, steel-reinforced concrete foundations of Seaver College in 1971, an event known in Pepperdine lore as the “birth of a college” dinner cemented the new college’s philosophical (and financial) foundations. Officially known as the Pepperdine College at Malibu Master Plan Announcement Dinner, the “birth of a college” dinner brought together educators, politicians, and donors on the rainy evening of February 9, 1970 to reveal the architectural plans and educational vision of the new campus. With over 3,400 people in attendance, the capacity crowd in the Century Plaza hotel spilled into the nearby Beverly Hilton, and the featured speakers shuttled between the two locations.

The keynote speaker for the event was Ronald Reagan, then governor of California and a longtime friend of Pepperdine College. President Nixon was represented by his aid, Jeb Stuart Magruder, a name later associated with the Watergate scandal. William Pereira, an architect who—already famous at the time—would go on to design the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco, presented his renderings of the Malibu campus buildings. Bill Banowsky, soon to be president of the new multi-campus Pepperdine University, gave a farsighted speech about liberal arts education. Pat Boone provided the musical entertainment.

By the 1960s, Pepperdine College had outgrown its location in southeastern Los Angeles, and social unrest in the area spurred the hunt for a new undergraduate campus. The “birth of a college” dinner marked a pivot point in Pepperdine’s history. The undergraduate campus was reborn in Malibu and the original “urban campus” became the graduate school for education and professional studies, with students serving as teachers in the local community. Pepperdine became a university.

Governor Reagan’s twenty-minute speech at the event lauds the importance of independent colleges and warns against an overemphasis on faculty research at the expense of actual teaching. His speech also invokes the milieu of 1970, with references ranging from student activism to the LA Rams. Reagan concludes:

“Let no one carelessly dismiss our obligation to the independent colleges and universities, which are so much a part of the educational tapestry of America. Without them, I promise you that tapestry would soon become a very simple fabric of great monotony and very little color.”

The “birth of a college” dinner is well documented in our Pepperdine Digital Collections. Over one hundred photographs capture the events of the evening and those in attendance. Put faces to the names that grace the buildings of Seaver College: Charles Payson, Fritz Huntsinger, Richard Scaife, Mildred Phillips, George Elkins, and, of course, Blanche Seaver. You can view selected highlights or, if you wish, the complete collection. You can also listen to Ronald Reagan’s speech or a recording of the entire event. Enjoy.

The Malibu hills before Pepperdine: A before-and-after slideshow

“I looked and found the center of the Malibu miracle: tall rugged mountains meandering gracefully down across the verdant meadow and melting into the sea. Point Dume and the Santa Barbara Channel Islands sparkled in the distance. In the soft foreground were the 138 acres destined to be Pepperdine’s home.”

These are the words of former Pepperdine University President William S. Banowsky in his recent memoir The Malibu Miracle recalling his first impression of the virgin Malibu foothills now home to Pepperdine University. The year was 1968. By the fall of 1972, Pepperdine’s campus in Malibu opened its doors, beginning a new chapter for the university, now inextricably linked with the celebrated, but quiet coastal community.

The 75th anniversary of Pepperdine University, which we celebrate this year, contains within it a second milestone: the 40th anniversary of Pepperdine in Malibu. In recognition of this occasion, we’ve reached into the archives to find images of these familiar Malibu hills as President Banowsky saw them in 1968 before construction.

Follow this link to the University Archives digital photograph collection, and see if you can recognize the rugged landscapes and vistas captured by photographers on the Malibu property in the late 1960s.

Then check out this before-and-after slideshow to see the same photographic perspectives separated by four decades.

Enjoy.