Tag Archives: Payson Library

Payson Library Hosts Game Night

Tournament winners Cyrus Reynolds and Michael Hart

Super Smash Brothers Brawl winners Cyrus Reynolds and Michael Hart.  Reynolds also won the Mario Kart tournament.

The Kresge Room of Payson Library was packed on Thursday, March 27 when the library hosted its first game night. The main draws were tournaments in the Wii favorites Super Smash Brothers Brawl and Mario Kart, but other games like Just Dance, Monopoly, and Apples to Apples were popular as well.

From 7pm to midnight, over 50 students battled each other for bragging rights and movie passes. After 35 matches, Cyrus Reynolds and Michael Hart took first place in the Smash Brothers double elimination tournament. Reynolds proved to be a double threat, as he also emerged victorious in the Mario Kart competition.

The event was the brainchild of librarian Paul Stenis, who had heard from students about Smash Bros. competitions happening in the dorms, and thought it would be a great way to bring the community together in the library, and hopefully help students make new friends.

Pizza, desserts, and cardboard Wii controllers filled with Gummi Bears were provided for the lucky students in attendance.

Special thanks to library staff Kimberly Chan, Jaimie Beth Colvin, Gail Lukavic, Mary Ann Naumann, Marc Vinyard, and Allen Wessels, whose invaluable efforts made Game Night a success.

Plans are being made for more Game Nights in the future, with the next to take place over Pepperdine’s Welcome Weekend in the fall. If you are interested in learning more about this and other events at Pepperdine Libraries, you can contact Jeanette.Woodburn@pepperdine.edu.

Christmas Illumination from the Saint John’s Bible on Display in Payson

The new Saint John’s Bible display in the Payson Library lobby is currently featuring an illumination of a nativity scene, from the first page of the book of Luke. The nativity scene shows a manger surrounded by animals in front, Mary and Joseph to the right, and the shepherds and townspeople on the left. A beam of light connects the manger upwards towards heaven. The angels intersect this beam to form a gold cross, reminding us that the reason for Christ’s birth was to be fulfilled with the crucifixion and resurrection. You can see the illumination online here, or visit Payson Library to see it in person.

The Saint John’s Bible is a work of sacred art that unites an ancient Christian tradition with the technology and vision of today, illuminating the Word of God for a new millennium. In 1998, Saint John’s Abbey and University commissioned renowned calligrapher Donald Jackson to produce the hand-written, hand-illuminated Bible. The Heritage Edition, on display in Payson Library, is a fine-art reproduction of the original with the mission of igniting the spiritual imagination of people on all faith journeys. Pepperdine University Libraries embraced this mission by acquiring this Bible for the University in honor of its 75th anniversary. One volume will remain on display in the Payson Library lobby, while the others are available for viewing in Special Collections. Please contact Melissa Nykanen at (310) 506-4434 or at melissa.nykanen@pepperdine.edu for more information.

Classical guitar concert series comes to Payson’s Surfboard Room

“Welcome to our boardroom,” remarked Mark Roosa, Pepperdine University’s Dean of Libraries, in reference to the thirty-odd surfboards that lined the walls of the chapel-like space in Payson Library that would serve as recital hall for the evening. Dean Roosa was introducing renowned classical guitarist Christopher Parkening, whose students would be performing for this, the first in a series of Guitar Program concerts held the second Tuesday of every month in the Surfboard Room of Payson Library.

Maestro Parkening, who serves as Distinguished Professor of Music at Pepperdine University, set the tone for the evening by showing a short film about his guitar teacher, the great Andrés Segovia. In addition to introducing the themes of pedagogy, legacy, and musical inheritance, the film demonstrated how Maestro Segovia was a pivotal figure in elevating the status of the guitar, earning its place on the stage and in the classical repertoire.

Following the film, eight of Maestro Parkening’s students performed in succession, each framed by the colonnade-like rows of surfboards composing the John Mazza Historic Surfboard collection. It’s hard to say what role the surfboards played in the surprisingly pleasing acoustics of the room—both intimate and expansive—that served the guitarists so well. The repertoire ranged from the sixteenth century to the twenty-first, and was well received by the near capacity audience. The concert concluded with four guitarist performing Pachelbel’s “Loose Canon,” a humorous take on that famous (and overplayed) Baroque canon by Johann Pachelbel as arranged by the Los Angeles String Quartet. The familiar tune made its way on an unexpected journey of musical styles, including reggae, bluegrass, flamenco, and even punk.

The students in performance included Sergio Gallardo, Joshua Ivy, Roberto Hermosillo, Brig Urias, Sebastian Olarte, Joseph Peliska, Alexander Park, and Kevin Enstrom. The photo above by Patrick Park shows Sergio Gallardo beginning the concert with Saudade No. 3 by French composer Roland Dyens.

The next concert in the series will be Tuesday, October 8, at 5 pm.  Once again in the Surfboard Room on the second floor of Payson Library.


Guitarists warm up in the Special Collections Reading Room adjacent to the Surfboard Room in Payson Library





Today is Constitution Day. Take the Quiz!

Today is Constitution Day, the 226th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution. It’s a day dedicated to the education and celebration of one of our nation’s principal founding documents. So, how much do you know about the U.S. Constitution? For example, did the Senate initially want the Constitution to refer to the U.S. President as “His Highness the President of the United States of America and Protector of their Liberties”? Find out when you take the Washington Post Constitution Day Quiz.

You can also celebrate Constitution Day by visiting Pepperdine University’s Payson Library, where rare Colonial documents are currently housed in our Special Collections Reading Room (appointments recommended). Featured in the recent library exhibit, “Becoming America: An Exhibition of Colonial Documents,” the materials available for browsing span from 1686 to 1781 and represent the cultural, philosophical, and political atmosphere leading up to and during the Revolutionary War (see image above). Although the exhibit has ended, these priceless Colonial-era documents are currently on loan to Payson Library from Pepperdine alumnus and attorney Michael J. Marlatt (JD ’84).

Happy Constitution Day!

Senior Chemistry Student Presents Honors Thesis Defense on Payson Library Indoor Air Quality

Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library.  I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area.  What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center.  Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books.  The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days.  (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels.  Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library.  Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials).  Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified.  This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment.  While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place!  The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.  Congratulations Tom!







Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library. I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area. What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

 

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center. Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

 

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

 

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books. The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days. (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels. Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

 

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library. Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

 

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials). Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

 

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified. This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment. While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place! The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

 

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.

Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library.   I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area.  What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center.  Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books.  The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days.  (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels.  Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library.  Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials).  Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified.  This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment.  While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place!  The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.

VoteRiders org addresses voter ID laws at Payson Library

Posted on behalf of Ken LaZebnik

Don Ringe and Kathleen Unger of VoteRiders speaking at Payson Library

“Always vote for principle, though you may vote alone, and you may cherish the sweetest reflection that your vote is never lost.”  —  John Quincy Adams

The right to vote is at the heart of the American experiment, and as we have all been aware since 2000, literally every vote counts.  The fundamental question of accessibility to voting was examined by veteran media campaign consultant Don Ringe and attorney Kathleen Unger, Founder and President of VoteRiders, in a presentation at Payson Library on October 4.

VoteRiders is a non-partisan, non-profit organization committed to obtaining voter registration identification to met the requirements of new laws in eleven states.  As of October 2012, some form of voter ID law is in effect in 30 states.  Unger stated her position that voter identification laws make it difficult for communities of color, elderly, veterans, and people with disabilities to produce the often complicated documentation required to vote.  VoteRiders works with key partners in selected states to acquire the necessary documents to vote.

Unger said, “Protecting the right to vote is not a partisan issue. It’s an American issue.  No citizen should be prevented from exercising this basic right.”  She continued:  “Some people may think it’s easy to get a photo ID.  Doesn’t everybody need one to drive a car, get on a plane, and buy cigarettes and alcohol?  Well, not everyone drives including people with disabilities, older adults – the Greatest Generation! – and low-income individuals.  Not everybody smokes or drinks alcohol.  And many citizens have their reasons why they do not travel on airplanes.”

To obtain the ID required by the new laws means at least one trip to the local DMV, but the bigger difficulty can be trying to get the documents the DMV requires to prove who you are and where you live.  A state may require a certified copy of your birth certificate with a raised seal (and, legal documentation of any change of name since then) – all of which costs money and can take time, plus a social security card plus two acceptable documents showing your name and address.

Voter ID laws affect hundreds of thousands of potential voters.  In the state of Pennsylvania alone reliable surveys and sources place the number of voters who lack a government issued ID at anywhere from 758,939 to 1.5 million.  VoteRiders has partnered with organizations across the country to facilitate individuals obtaining the documents they need to vote.

Don Ringe added, “This is just another form of poll tax.  These requirements put an unfair burden on the poor and elderly living off Social Security who simply can’t afford the $20 or $50 to pay for a birth certificate. It should be free. That’s what the right to vote is all about. ”

For more information about VoteRiders, and to view a video outlining their project, click to their website:  VoteRiders.

Our Changing Library: Today’s featured digital object

Payson Library in 1982

If you’re a regular to Payson Library, the image to the right may seem at once familiar and oddly out of place. This is a semi-outdoor stairway that used to lead upstairs from the Pendleton Learning Center to the first floor of the library—a skylight opened overhead and a decorative screen separated the stairs from the first floor entrance just outside. There was no stairway here to the second floor, which at the time was home to university administration offices accessed directly by a footbridge to the parking lot.

An historic capital campaign in the mid-1980s—the Wave of Excellence Campaign—gave us the Charles B. Thornton Administrative Center, allowing Payson Library to reclaim its second floor amidst massive library-wide renovations. In 1987, Payson Library emerged greatly expanded with a new, distinctive northern (mountainside) entrance and an infrastructure better designed for the computer era. This is the Payson Library we know today.


Proposed design for Payson Library entryway

Now, nearly four decades after Pepperdine’s arrival in Malibu, we find ourselves in the midst of another ambitious capital campaign, the Campaign for Pepperdine. A portion of these funds is designated for the renovation of Payson Library based on the belief, as expressed by President Andy Benton, that “a university cannot rise higher than the quality of its libraries.” The goals for the campaign include a new Learning Commons, a Special Collections and Archive wing, and a new second floor entrance that connects the library to Mullin Town Square (above). The result will be a library reimagined as the new student union—a third space between the dorm and the classroom for students to study, collaborate, and socialize.

On the eve of this exciting transformation, we invite you to explore the Payson Library of days past. Click here to view a selection of photos from the University Archives Photograph Collection that capture Payson Library before the 1987 remodel. See if you can spot the differences.

Enjoy.

The Eagle: Today’s featured digital object

Symbolism, as we know, is often weighty. But the giant bird of prey that greets students entering Payson Library makes an especially hefty statement on the subject of freedom, weighing in at 800 pounds. Officially known as “American Eagle,” the wooden sculpture depicts the beast alighting atop a snarling mass of branches, mid-screech as it spreads its seven-foot wingspan above. No matter your personal opinion regarding the aesthetic virtues of the piece, its origin story is fascinating and worth sharing.


American Eagle sculpture in Payson Library

The eagle landed in Payson Library in 1972 as a gift from Fritz Huntsinger, Sr., a businessman whose quiet philanthropy belied a surprisingly “cinematic” personal history. Born in Switzerland at the turn of the century, Huntsinger fought for the Germans in World War I, a disillusioning experience that led him to immigrate to the United States in 1923 at the age of 24. Settling in Ventura, California, he worked his way from floor-sweeper to Chairman of the Board with the Vetco manufacturing company, taking a break along the way to fight for the Allies in World War II.

If his name sounds familiar, it’s because he leant it (along with a lot of cash) to the Huntsinger Academic Center, which includes Payson Library. The eagle was his personal touch. Huntsinger commissioned the carving from two sculptors in Taiwan, who carved the figure from a single piece of teakwood based on his specifications. For Huntsinger, the eagle embodied “total and complete freedom,” including “academic freedom,” and served as a gesture of gratitude to the nation that enabled the transformative gains of his life.

In this photo, from the University Archives Photograph Collection, we see the eagle in its original location at the heart of Payson Library. Following massive renovations to the library in the mid-1980s, the eagle moved to the new entrance, where it resides today.