Tag Archives: photographs

Pepperdine’s Fight against Communism: Announcing the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum digital collection

Freedom Forum luncheon in the Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles, 1960

Freedom Forum luncheon in the Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles, 1960

The Pepperdine College Freedom Forum was an annual, three-day seminar designed to promote American values as a defense against communism, held in Los Angeles between 1959 and 1971. The model for the Freedom Forum grew out of the National Education Program developed by George S. Benson, President of Harding College. At Pepperdine, President M. Norvel Young carried the idea forward, where it was sometimes referred to as the California Freedom Forum. The Freedom Forum was part of a larger constellation of anti-communist activities at Pepperdine College, which included a weekly Speaker’s Bureau, an anti-communist film series, and various citizen education and teacher training programs.

Billed as a “seminar to prepare leadership for American resistance to the spread of Communism and Socialism,” the inaugural Freedom Forum in 1959 featured talks such as “Communism’s Invisible Weapon—Brainwashing” and “What Socialism Has Delivered in Europe.” The featured speaker that first year was Senator John L. McClellan, who delivered the keynote “Can American Freedom Survive?” before a packed house of 800 California business leaders in the ballroom of the Biltmore Hotel.

Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce that hundreds of program booklets, typed speeches, photographs, newspaper clippings, and interviews from all thirteen years of the Freedom Forum are now available to researchers and the interested public through the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum digital collection. This collection is a digitized subset of the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum Records available for research in our Special Collections and University Archives located in Payson Library on the Malibu campus.

Richard Arens of the House Committe on Un-American Activities speaking at the 1959 Freedom Forum

Richard Arens of the House Committe on Un-American Activities speaking at the 1959 Freedom Forum

Program cover featuring Senator Barry Goldwater, 1961

Program cover featuring Senator Barry Goldwater, 1961

Don McCulloch presenting on Communism and brainwashing at the 1959 Freedom Forum

Don McCulloch presenting on Communism and brainwashing at the 1959 Freedom Forum

Introducing the Alumni Memories digital collection

Bernice Pitts receiving her degree at GPC from President Tiner

Bernice Pitts receiving her degree at GPC from President Tiner

Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce the launch of the Alumni Memories Collection, a new digital collection designed to honor the lives of our alumni and the special bond they’ve formed with Pepperdine University. The collection, freely accessible online, is composed of photographs, memorabilia, documents, scrapbooks, correspondence, and other materials donated to Pepperdine University Libraries by alumni of George Pepperdine College and Pepperdine University. The items in this collection, arranged by theme or donor, strive to capture the “Pepperdine experience” while providing a glimpse into the lives of the men and women that call Pepperdine their alma mater.

Christmas Card sent to the Pitts from M. Norvel Young and Family

Christmas Card sent to the Pitts from M. Norvel Young and Family

The flagship donation for the Alumni Memories Collection comes to us from Bernice M. (Carr) Pitts (’49), who provides numerous photographs and documents related to the life she shared with her husband, Carroll Pitts, Jr. (’54). Bernice and Carroll were the first African-American students to live in Normandie Village, the married student housing complex on the original Los Angeles campus of George Pepperdine College. In addition to photos of campus, the collection includes photos and clippings related to the Pitts family, Churches of Christ history in Southern California, and the Pitts’ ongoing relationship with fellow GPC alumnus Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn.

Bernice and Carroll Pitts receive a commemorative certificate from L.A. County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn in 1982

Bernice and Carroll Pitts receive a commemorative certificate from L.A. County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn in 1982

Carroll Pitts, Jr. also earned an M.A. in Religion from Pepperdine College in 1969, producing his thesis A Critical Study of Civil Rights Practices, Attitudes and Responsibilities in Churches of Christ. Throughout his career, Carroll specialized in church administration and personal evangelism, serving as the Minister of the Normandie Church of Christ in Los Angeles for over two decades. Carroll and Bernice traveled widely in support of Christian education, conducting workshops and gospel meetings in places as diverse as South Africa, Egypt, Rome, London, and Haiti. Carroll also taught classes at the annual Pepperdine Bible Lectures in addition to teaching part-time in Pepperdine University’s Religion Division. He passed in 1987. We are very grateful to Bernice for this donation, which we hope will honor his memory and celebrate the achievements they made together through a life devoted to God and Christian education.

If you are an alumnus interested in donating materials to this collection, please contact our Archivist, Katie Richardson at (310) 506-4323 or Katie.Richardson@pepperdine.edu.

Photographs of veteran Hollywood stuntman Chuck Waters now online

Swashbuckler (1976)

Swashbuckler (1976)

Pepperdine University Libraries is thrilled to announce the Chuck Waters Collection, a new addition to Pepperdine Digital Collections. Chuck Waters, veteran stuntman of film and television, shares his personal photographs, correspondence, and stories chronicling more than forty years in the film industry. Waters (b. 1934) has served as stunt performer or stunt coordinator on over 130 films, including The Deer Hunter, The Exorcist, the Indiana Jones trilogy, numerous films by Clint Eastwood, and many more.

The photographs in this digital collection capture the stunt industry at its height, decades before green screens, wires, and computer-generated imagery (CGI). Working for some of the biggest names in Hollywood—George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, William Friedkin, Francis Ford Coppola, and others—Waters has been set on fire, rolled in crashing cars, clotheslined off motorcycles, driven off cliffs, dropped from helicopters, thrown off horses, and hurled down stairs (yes those stairs in The Exorcist).

Chuck Waters (left) doubling Martin Sheen

Chuck Waters (left) doubling Martin Sheen

As Waters tells us, “We, my fellow stuntmen and stuntwomen, had to figure out how to do our stunts as safe as possible so that we could live to see another day of stunts—as dangerous as they were. And sometimes they did not get to see the next day!”

Come see how they did it. The photographs in the collection cover the range of Waters’ career, from Adam West’s Batman television series to The Mask of Zorro. Enjoy.

KAPOW!

KAPOW!

Materials derive from the Chuck Waters Papers, a part of the Film and Television Collection of Pepperdine University Libraries’ Special Collections and University Archives.

Pepperdine Honors 50th Anniversary of JFK’s Death with Screening and Exhibit

Herschensohn Exhibit Poster jpgOn Friday, November 22nd, from 2-4:30pm, fifty years to the day following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Pepperdine University Libraries and the School of Public Policy will host a screening of John F. Kennedy: Years of Lightning, Day of Drums, with director Bruce Herschensohn.

During the entire month of November, a complementary exhibit will be held in Payson Library that explores the making of this film with photographs, correspondence, posters, memorabilia, and other images.

The 90-minute film, produced by the United States Information Agency (USIA) and written and directed by Herschensohn, examined the life, death, and impact of John F. Kennedy shortly after his assassination. It features extensive excerpts from Kennedy’s speeches, including color footage of his swearing in and inaugural address. Gregory Peck served as the narrator of the film, and it was ultimately shown in more than 100 countries and in 30 languages. The USIA produced media about American for foreign audiences. Because audiences were so moved by this film, a special act of Congress in 1965 allowed it to be distributed in the U.S. for viewing by domestic audiences.

The film screening at Pepperdine will be followed by a Q&A with writer and director, Bruce Herschensohn. The event is free and open to the public.

The exhibit, which will be on display in Payson Library throughout the month of November, features materials from the Bruce Herschsensohn Papers about the making of John F. Kennedy: Years of Lightning, Day of Drums. These materials document the filming of the worldwide reaction to Kennedy’s death, including the funeral proceedings in Washington, D.C., and memorial services around the world; the development of the film script and music; the worldwide release and international acclaim of the film; and the distribution within the U.S. Related materials can be found in the Pepperdine Digital Collections.

The materials in the exhibit are taken from the Bruce Herschensohn Papers, which are held by Pepperdine University’s Special Collections and University Archives, where they are available for research. Digital images from the collection are also available online in the Pepperdine Digital Collections. The collection includes items collected and created by Herschensohn as an independent filmmaker, a Director of Motion Pictures and Television at the United States Information Agency (USIA), a member of staff at the White House for Presidents Nixon and Reagan, and a political commentator for the KABC television and radio stations. Materials include correspondence, photographs, video and audio recordings, manuscripts, musical compositions, drawings, newspaper clippings, and other items related to the development of his films.

Bruce Herschensohn is a political commentator, author and senior fellow at the Pepperdine University School of Public Policy in Malibu, California.  He served in the Nixon and Reagan administrations and is the author of nine books, in addition to being a filmmaker and producer.

Please contact Melissa Nykanen at (310) 506-4434 or at melissa.nykanen@pepperdine.edu for questions about the screening or exhibit.

Premiere of the film in Karachi, Pakistan, November 25, 1964.

Premiere of the film in Karachi, Pakistan, November 25, 1964.

A poster from the U.S. distribution of the film.

A poster from the U.S. distribution of the film.

Pepperdine Digital Collections launches the Malibu Historical Photograph Collection

The Malibu Historical Photograph Collection is now available online through Pepperdine Digital Collections. Designed for historians, students, Malibuites, or anyone interested in the visual history of our seaside community, the Malibu Historical Photograph Collection includes images of Malibu people, places, and things dating back to 1890. Each photograph has been scanned and uploaded at a high resolution to allow detailed in-browser zooming with options to download. Furthermore, users can identify a photo’s original vantage point on Google Maps through historypin.com; you can even compare historical photos with today’s Google Street View, when available (hint: move the “Fade” switch back and forth).

Pepperdine University Libraries is very grateful to Lani Netter, whose donation of historical prints served as the seed for the Malibu Historical Photograph Collection. And keep your eyes on this collection—it will grow fast as we digitize our vast archive of historical photographs donated to Pepperdine University by The Malibu Times. Enjoy.

Change at the Corner of Manchester and Vermont

A few months ago, the archives received a reference question asking us to search for photos and information about early landscaping at George Pepperdine College, at the campus located at 79th and Vermont in Los Angeles.  Hmm, tough…  While I searched the archives for pictures of landscaping and the Los Angeles campus, the first collection I went to was the George Pepperdine College records.  The collection was recently created by gathering materials from University Archives files (mostly papers and photographs) about Pepperdine between 1937 and 1972 not already divided into other collections.

What completely surprised me was a pile of photographs in the middle of an enormous stack — panoramic photographs of the intersection of Manchester Avenue and Vermont Avenue, just half a mile south of the site of the Los Angeles campus!  Best of all, there were five photographs, taken in 5-year intervals to document the changes at the intersection from 1920 to 1945.

Notice how the Clark Drug Store stays consistent in the early photographs (but gets a building upgrade!), and how there is even a Western Auto Supply Company store in the 1930 and 1940 photographs?  Take a closer look for yourself to see how the area changed.  (Click the images to make them larger, and click once again to see the full size image.)

To view these images in person, to view the George Pepperdine College records or other collections, or do research on any of these materials or other collections in the archives, please contact Katie Richardson, Archivist for Special Collections and University Archives, at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-4323.


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1940

When the President came to Pepperdine: Today’s featured digital object

President Gerald Ford (right) greets actor John Wayne, with benefactor Richard Seaver (center)

On Founder’s Day, September 20, 1975, as Pepperdine University’s Malibu campus began its fourth year of activity, the university was honored by an official visit from the President of the United States, Gerald R. Ford. This was the first time a sitting President had visited Pepperdine, a milestone indicative of both the prestige the university had gained nationally and the ties its administration held with the Republican Party. The day was marked by two building dedications on the rapidly growing campus, both of which featured remarks by President Ford. A VIP brunch ceremony dedicated the Brock House, home to the university president, and this was followed by a public gathering of over 18,000 attendees to witness the dedication of the Firestone Fieldhouse, the campus’ athletics facility. Newly discovered and digitized, the audio recording of President Ford’s dedication of the Firestone Fieldhouse is now available online in our Historic Sound Recordings collection.

The 18,000 strong crowd at the Firestone Fieldhouse dedication, 1975

In addition to a twenty-minute speech by President Ford (on the important role of independent universities and free enterprise in the national education system), the recording also features the pomp and ritual particular to that era, including Pat Boone singing the national anthem and John Wayne leading a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance.

Although it may not be apparent in this recording, President Ford’s visit to Pepperdine occurred during a period of heightened anxiety for both the president and the university. Just two weeks earlier, Squeaky Fromme, a follower of Charles Manson, had attempted to assassinate President Ford in Sacramento (the gun failed to discharge). Security at Pepperdine was intense and there were no incidents; however, just two days later, Sara Jane Moore fired on the president in San Francisco in a second failed attempt. Meanwhile, four days before President Ford was to arrive at Pepperdine, M. Norvel Young, Chancellor of Pepperdine University, crashed his car into another vehicle on the Pacific Coast Highway, causing the death of two motorists. The shadow of this tragedy nearly derailed the Presidential visit, but the event continued as planned.

In addition to listening to the recording, you can also view photographs of the day’s events. Enjoy.

Introducing Historypin: Putting Pepperdine history on the map



Search for historic photos near you with the Historypin mobile app


Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce the launch of its new channel with Historypin.com, a website and mobile application that allows the pinning of historical photographs, audio recordings, and moving image files to Google Maps. Would you like to see the Malibu hills in 1969 before the arrival of Pepperdine University, overlaid seamlessly with the current Google street view? Or perhaps you’d like to take a drive across the newly opened San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge in 1940? You can do all of these things—and more—in our new, interactive Historypin.com channel.

Historypin.com, developed by the nonprofit We Are What We Do in partnership with Google Maps, facilitates social mapping, in which individuals or institutions create a visual history of a particular spot on Earth through pinning digitized photographs (or other media) along with the stories that contextualize and enrich the history behind the images. Historypin calls this “fourth dimensional mapping,” a phenomenon that enables new ways for users to interact with historical photographs. For example, when you visit the Historypin website or mobile application, you can view the image, compare it with the current Google street view (when available), add your own stories to the image feed, use your smart phone to take a “Historypin Repeat” of the same scene, or link to the original image in our digital collections. In addition to searching or browsing images via the map, you can interact with materials in thematic collections or go on virtual walking tours.

Pepperdine University Libraries is utilizing Historypin to further the twin goals of its Special Collections and University Archives department: to preserve and disseminate the history of Pepperdine University and serve as the primary historical repository for the Malibu community. In addition to creating our own Historypin collections and tours, we are leveraging the unique strengths of Historypin to foster collaborations with other university departments and make new inroads into the Malibu community.



Student life 25 years ago today: Today’s featured digital object

In February of 1988, Pepperdine University’s alumni newspaper, The Pepperdine Voice, featured a photo spread titled “A Day in the Life of Pepperdine University.” The introductory text read:

“On Thursday, Jan. 7, 1988, seven photographers were deployed to scour all areas of campus to capture the daily activities of Pepperdine on film…What sort of day was Jan. 7? It was an ordinary day in Pepperdine life, and that is why it was chosen—to show the miracle of the mundane—students, faculty and staff at work, at play, in solitude and in action.”

The original prints and negatives produced for this project are now housed in our University Archives and were recently scanned for the University Archives Photograph (digital) Collection. Continuing our celebration of 40 years in Malibu, I encourage you to view this photographic time capsule of student life in the ‘80s. Technology and fashion may have changed, but I think you’ll agree that the “Waves spirit” captured in these photos is timeless.

View the slideshow, or explore these photos in our digital collections.

Happy New Year!

ARTstor now available on-campus and off-campus


Senufo, Pelerova Masker, 1979. Tiasso, Côte d'Ivoire. Photographed by Herbert Cole.

Senufo, Pelerova Masker, 1979. Tiasso, Côte d'Ivoire. Photographed by Herbert Cole.


Following a successful trial, Pepperdine University Libraries have subscribed to ARTstor,  a nonprofit resource that provides more than one million digital images in the arts, architecture, humanities, and sciences with an accessible suite of software tools for teaching and research. Its community-built collections comprise contributions from outstanding international museums, photographers, libraries, scholars, photo archives, and artists and artists’ estates.  Collections are useful for teaching and study in a wide range of subject areas, including art, architecture, music, religion, anthropology, literature, world history, American Studies, Asian Studies, Classical Studies, Medieval Studies, Renaissance Studies, and more.

Katsushika Hokusai; Kanagarwa-oki nami ura  (c., 1830-32 )

Subject Guides highlight featured collections and  provide search tips plus suggested search terms.  For example, the Asian Studies handout highlights ARTstor content related to the history and culture of Asia, as illustrated by works of art and architecture, from traditional forms to contemporary works, as well as photographs of historical events and figures.


For full functionality, once logged in you must register for an individual account.

  • Remote Access
    Users can create a registered user account when accessing ARTstor from a valid IP address (either on campus or through a proxy server). Each registered user account allows for a 120-day Remote Access Period during which it may be used to access ARTstor from any computer. Each time a user logs in to his or her account from an authenticated IP address, the 120-day period is reset. Registration details.
  • ARTstor Mobile
    ARTstor is accessible to registered users on the iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch. The mobile site allows registered users to search, browse, and view previously created image groups. ARTstor Mobile also provides a Flashcard View. Mobile help.

Instructors wishing to share ARTstor content with students through local courseware systems such as Blackboard, WebCT, Sakai, or Moodle can do so in a variety of ways.  Students can enhance Power Point presentations with ARTstor images. Permitted and prohibited uses are succinctly summarized.

For faster access on-campus, use this link:  http://www.artstor.org and click on ‘Enter Here”

Learn more about the history and mission of ARTstor in this UTube video Introduction to ARTstor with Neil Rudenstine and James Shulman.

Keep up to date with new additions and ideas for teaching and scholarship by reading the ARTstor Blog.