Tag Archives: special collections

Special Collections Intern Processes Two Collections

Kendal Copeland, a junior at Pepperdine, interned in Special Collections and University Archives during the fall semester. Kendal was responsible for enhancing the finding aid of the Pepperdine University Athletics Records and the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum Records. She described both collections in greater detail, adding folder level description to Archivists’ Toolkit and updating the finding aids. Kendal had this to say about her experience interning in the department:

football60004This semester I had the opportunity to intern in Special Collections and University Archives. The experience was a lot of fun, interesting, and educational. I learned all about the hard work that goes into maintaining, organizing, and preserving a collection.I worked on two collections; the Pepperdine University Athletics Records and the Pepperdine Freedom Forum Records.

While processing the athletics records, I was able to see the evolution of sports at Pepperdine from the late 1930’s to the present. Through articles, programs, newspaper clippings, videos, and photographs I had the opportunity to see how sports became more integrated. In addition, I was able to see the progress of women athletes over the years.

One thing I really enjoyed was being able to read and look at photos of the Pepperdine football team from its beginning to end (1946-1961).  I was even able to box a 1946 football lettermen jacket. The evolution of uniforms and how much they have changed was fun to see. I think it was for the best that men’s basketball uniforms have evolved the way they have.

A photograph I found very interesting was of a women’s football team here at Pepperdine. The caption on the back says “Women’s Football, 1960.”

football60003When I finished working on the athletics records, I processed a small collection on the Pepperdine College Freedom Forums. The Pepperdine College Freedom Forum was a three day seminar on promoting and defending American values co-sponsored by Pepperdine College and the National Education Program held annually on campus from 1959 to 1971. I was amazed at the amount of guest speakers over the years that came out to the forums. It was very insightful to read the speeches because I got a chance in a small way to experience what times were like during that time period.

For further information about viewing the collections or for information on the types of internships available with Special Collections and University Archives please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu

T.E. Lawrence Exhibit Opens in Payson Library

This blog post was written by Victoria Collie, Special Collections and University Archives Intern.

An exhibit highlighting the Metcalf Collection of Books on T.E. Lawrence is now open on the main level of Payson Library. Housed in the Special Collections and University Archives, this is the first lawrence bk collectiontime the books have been on display. The book collection and associated Metcalf papers were donated to Pepperdine by Edwards H. Metcalf (1911-2001), a Pepperdine University board member and grandson of millionaire Henry Edwards Huntington. Metcalf was a T.E. Lawrence enthusiast, and helped plan Pepperdine’s T.E. Lawrence Symposium in 1988. The book collection alone contains over 400 books on Lawrence and the Middle East. If you would like to learn more about T.E. Lawrence and the book collection, check out the new InfoGuide! It provides a good starting place for research.

from With Lawrence in Arabia

T.E. Lawrence, 1919
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:With_Lawrence_in_Arabia.jpg

T.E. Lawrence, or “Lawrence of Arabia,” was an extremely intelligent and complex person, who seemed restless until he found his calling in the Middle East fighting alongside the Arab leaders during the Arab Revolt of 1916-1918. He had been familiar with the region before, taking several trips to the area and becoming used to the language and the Arab way of life. His use of guerrilla activities against the Turks during the revolt gained him sudden notoriety. After the war, he ran from his new found fame, using assumed names when enlisting in the Royal Air Force. He died in 1935 at the age of 46. Lawrence wrote a variety of works, including Seven Pillars of Wisdom, which is on display. Also included in the exhibit is his college thesis, Crusader Castles (1936). There are many controversies surrounding Lawrence’s career and life, but he will continue to be the subject of admiration and speculation for years to come.

amman aerodome 1921

Sir Herbert Samuel is pictured in the white hat; Lawrence is pictured to the left of him, and Emir Abdullah is seen on the right. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-DIG-ppmsca-19413

Alan Reed Papers Available for Use!

The blog post was written by Special Collections and University Archives Intern, Beth McDonald.

Headshot_1Pepperdine Special Collections and University Archives is pleased to announce the addition of a new collection to the archives: The Alan Reed Papers. The collection is available both in the University Archives and online through Pepperdine Digital Collections.

Alan Reed was a noted film, stage, and voice actor from the 1930s through 1960s and is best known as the original voice of Fred Flintstone on the Hanna-Barbera cartoon show The Flintstones.

The collection includes photographs, correspondence, newspaper clippings, and short essays that Reed wrote. Each document and  photograph has been scanned and uploaded at a high resolution to allow detailed in-browser zooming with options to download. Additionally, Reed’s biography Yabba Dabba Doo! is available to checkout at the Payson library.

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For more information about the collection, please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310)506-4323.

Pepperdine Honors 50th Anniversary of JFK’s Death with Screening and Exhibit

Herschensohn Exhibit Poster jpgOn Friday, November 22nd, from 2-4:30pm, fifty years to the day following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Pepperdine University Libraries and the School of Public Policy will host a screening of John F. Kennedy: Years of Lightning, Day of Drums, with director Bruce Herschensohn.

During the entire month of November, a complementary exhibit will be held in Payson Library that explores the making of this film with photographs, correspondence, posters, memorabilia, and other images.

The 90-minute film, produced by the United States Information Agency (USIA) and written and directed by Herschensohn, examined the life, death, and impact of John F. Kennedy shortly after his assassination. It features extensive excerpts from Kennedy’s speeches, including color footage of his swearing in and inaugural address. Gregory Peck served as the narrator of the film, and it was ultimately shown in more than 100 countries and in 30 languages. The USIA produced media about American for foreign audiences. Because audiences were so moved by this film, a special act of Congress in 1965 allowed it to be distributed in the U.S. for viewing by domestic audiences.

The film screening at Pepperdine will be followed by a Q&A with writer and director, Bruce Herschensohn. The event is free and open to the public.

The exhibit, which will be on display in Payson Library throughout the month of November, features materials from the Bruce Herschsensohn Papers about the making of John F. Kennedy: Years of Lightning, Day of Drums. These materials document the filming of the worldwide reaction to Kennedy’s death, including the funeral proceedings in Washington, D.C., and memorial services around the world; the development of the film script and music; the worldwide release and international acclaim of the film; and the distribution within the U.S. Related materials can be found in the Pepperdine Digital Collections.

The materials in the exhibit are taken from the Bruce Herschensohn Papers, which are held by Pepperdine University’s Special Collections and University Archives, where they are available for research. Digital images from the collection are also available online in the Pepperdine Digital Collections. The collection includes items collected and created by Herschensohn as an independent filmmaker, a Director of Motion Pictures and Television at the United States Information Agency (USIA), a member of staff at the White House for Presidents Nixon and Reagan, and a political commentator for the KABC television and radio stations. Materials include correspondence, photographs, video and audio recordings, manuscripts, musical compositions, drawings, newspaper clippings, and other items related to the development of his films.

Bruce Herschensohn is a political commentator, author and senior fellow at the Pepperdine University School of Public Policy in Malibu, California.  He served in the Nixon and Reagan administrations and is the author of nine books, in addition to being a filmmaker and producer.

Please contact Melissa Nykanen at (310) 506-4434 or at melissa.nykanen@pepperdine.edu for questions about the screening or exhibit.

Premiere of the film in Karachi, Pakistan, November 25, 1964.

Premiere of the film in Karachi, Pakistan, November 25, 1964.

A poster from the U.S. distribution of the film.

A poster from the U.S. distribution of the film.

Guess who’s turning 40? Stauffer Chapel (slideshow)

Stauffer ChapelPepperdine University’s own “little chapel on the hill” turns 40 years old today. Stauffer Chapel was dedicated on November 4, 1973 about one year after Pepperdine’s Malibu campus opened its doors. Named for longtime Pepperdine supporter Beverly Stauffer, the chapel stands at the southern edge of campus overlooking the wide vista of the Pacific Ocean. Encased by 3,000 square feet of stained glass, Stauffer Chapel is the spiritual heart of campus, providing a sanctuary for worship, prayer, song, or quiet reflection.

Our chapel has played this role now for four decades. To mark this milestone, we’ve assembled a brief slideshow of archival photos from Stauffer Chapel’s history. All of these images can also be found in the Pepperdine Digital Collections. Enjoy.

Happy World Day for Audiovisual Heritage!

Here’s something that you may not have known: this Sunday, October 27th, is World Day for Audiovisual Heritage. And why should you care? While you may be hard pressed to find a Happy World Day for Audiovisual Heritage card at the Hallmark store, it speaks to a very important issue. Experts estimate that we have only 10 to 15 years left to digitize the wealth of content on analog audiovisual media—such as film, reel-to-reel tape, and even VHS—dating to the mid to late 20th century. This material constitutes an indispensable complement to the written record of our collective world history, and it is at risk of permanent loss due to the vulnerability of these media to decay, damage, and playback obsolescence.

The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) launched the World Day for Audiovisual Heritage in 2005 in order to acknowledge the importance of audiovisual recordings and raise general awareness of the need for urgent measures to be taken to preserve them.

Pepperdine University Libraries has responded to this charge by partnering with the California Audiovisual Preservation Project, an initiative of the California Preservation Program that provides digitization and access services for historic California audiovisual recordings. So far, more than two dozen films, reel-to-reel tapes, and other vulnerable recordings in our Special Collections and University Archives have been digitized for preservation purposes through this collaboration. These recordings, such as this recently digitized speech by Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor at the 1985 Pepperdine Law School Dinner, are now available in our Pepperdine Digital Collections.

Please visit the links above to discover how you can contribute to the preservation of the world’s audiovisual heritage.

Special Collections Welcomes Three Interns

Special Collections is pleased to host three interns during the fall 2013 semester!

Beth McDonald is a graduate student in the Library and Information Science program at UCLA. During the internship, she will process two of our newest acquisitions the Alan Reed Papers and the Michael D. “Micky” Moore Papers. Reed and Moore were both active in the film and television industry. Reed is best known as the original voice of Fred Flintstone on the show The Flintstones while Moore is probably best known for his work as a second unit director on such projects as the Indiana Jones trilogy, Patton, and The Ten Commandments. The project includes arranging and describing materials, writing a finding aid, adding descriptive information to Archivists’ Toolkit, uploading the finding aids to the Online Archive of California, creating MARC records to add to the library catalog, and assisting the archivist with selecting items for digitization or an upcoming exhibit.

Kendal Copeland is a junior at Pepperdine University majoring in Sports Broadcasting and minoring in History. Kendal will enhance the finding aid of the Pepperdine University Athletics Records. Kendal will describe the collection in greater detail, adding folder level description to Archivists’ Toolkit and updating the finding aid. She will also assist the archivist with selecting items for digitization or an exhibit.

Victoria Collie is a graduate student in the School of Library and Information Science at San Jose State University. She is currently working on the Edwards Metcalf Collection of Books on T.E. Lawrence. Victoria is creating a research guide to the collection, including a biography of Lawrence, an annotated bibliography of selected materials in the collection, and curated lists of research resources on Lawrence. In addition, Victoria will also be doing detailed processing of the related Metcalf Papers and creating an exhibit of materials from the collection.








If you see Beth, Kendal, or Victoria around this fall make sure you say hi!

For further questions about internships or Special Collections and University Archives please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310)506-4323.

Today is Constitution Day. Take the Quiz!

Today is Constitution Day, the 226th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution. It’s a day dedicated to the education and celebration of one of our nation’s principal founding documents. So, how much do you know about the U.S. Constitution? For example, did the Senate initially want the Constitution to refer to the U.S. President as “His Highness the President of the United States of America and Protector of their Liberties”? Find out when you take the Washington Post Constitution Day Quiz.

You can also celebrate Constitution Day by visiting Pepperdine University’s Payson Library, where rare Colonial documents are currently housed in our Special Collections Reading Room (appointments recommended). Featured in the recent library exhibit, “Becoming America: An Exhibition of Colonial Documents,” the materials available for browsing span from 1686 to 1781 and represent the cultural, philosophical, and political atmosphere leading up to and during the Revolutionary War (see image above). Although the exhibit has ended, these priceless Colonial-era documents are currently on loan to Payson Library from Pepperdine alumnus and attorney Michael J. Marlatt (JD ’84).

Happy Constitution Day!

Pepperdine Digital Collections launches the Malibu Historical Photograph Collection

The Malibu Historical Photograph Collection is now available online through Pepperdine Digital Collections. Designed for historians, students, Malibuites, or anyone interested in the visual history of our seaside community, the Malibu Historical Photograph Collection includes images of Malibu people, places, and things dating back to 1890. Each photograph has been scanned and uploaded at a high resolution to allow detailed in-browser zooming with options to download. Furthermore, users can identify a photo’s original vantage point on Google Maps through historypin.com; you can even compare historical photos with today’s Google Street View, when available (hint: move the “Fade” switch back and forth).

Pepperdine University Libraries is very grateful to Lani Netter, whose donation of historical prints served as the seed for the Malibu Historical Photograph Collection. And keep your eyes on this collection—it will grow fast as we digitize our vast archive of historical photographs donated to Pepperdine University by The Malibu Times. Enjoy.

Change at the Corner of Manchester and Vermont

A few months ago, the archives received a reference question asking us to search for photos and information about early landscaping at George Pepperdine College, at the campus located at 79th and Vermont in Los Angeles.  Hmm, tough…  While I searched the archives for pictures of landscaping and the Los Angeles campus, the first collection I went to was the George Pepperdine College records.  The collection was recently created by gathering materials from University Archives files (mostly papers and photographs) about Pepperdine between 1937 and 1972 not already divided into other collections.

What completely surprised me was a pile of photographs in the middle of an enormous stack — panoramic photographs of the intersection of Manchester Avenue and Vermont Avenue, just half a mile south of the site of the Los Angeles campus!  Best of all, there were five photographs, taken in 5-year intervals to document the changes at the intersection from 1920 to 1945.

Notice how the Clark Drug Store stays consistent in the early photographs (but gets a building upgrade!), and how there is even a Western Auto Supply Company store in the 1930 and 1940 photographs?  Take a closer look for yourself to see how the area changed.  (Click the images to make them larger, and click once again to see the full size image.)

To view these images in person, to view the George Pepperdine College records or other collections, or do research on any of these materials or other collections in the archives, please contact Katie Richardson, Archivist for Special Collections and University Archives, at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-4323.


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