Tag Archives: special collections

Kennedy in June, 50 Years On: Today’s featured digital object

President Kennedy at the Berlin Wall in "The Five Cities of June"

It was Fifty years ago today that President John F. Kennedy made his historic Cold War era speech at the western gate of the Berlin Wall. The speech, highly critical of communism’s restrictions on personal freedom, included the memorable refrain “Let them come to Berlin” and, of course, the famous phrase “ich bin ein Berliner.” President Kennedy’s speech was captured by filmmaker Bruce Herschensohn, who used the speech as the final segment of his 1963 documentary The Five Cities of June.

Produced for the United States Information Agency, The Five Cities of June features five distinct historical events, each taking place in June 1963 in five different cities around the globe. These events include the election and coronation of Pope Paul VI in the Vatican; the launching of a rocket from an unknown Soviet location; skirmishes between North and South Vietnamese in Ben Tuong, South Vietnam; the integration of the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa with the assistance of U.S. Marshals; and President Kennedy’s speech at the Berlin Wall. Charlton Heston provides the narration; Bruce Herschensohn provides the screenplay, music, and direction. The film was nominated for Best Achievement in Documentary Production (Short Subjects).

JFK and West Berlin Mayor Willie Brandt on souvenir postcard, 1963

The Bruce Herschensohn Collection in Pepperdine Digital Collections provides access to a wealth of rare materials related to the production of this film and the events it depicts. This includes correspondence, production notes, artwork, scripts, and ephemera. View, for example, a souvenir postcard from the Berlin Wall signed by President Kennedy bearing a special cancellation mark for the occasion. Click here to browse other materials in the Bruce Herschensohn Collection related to The Five Cities of June. You can view the entire 27-minute film here. Enjoy.

Pepperdine Students Make Progress on Archival Collections

Two Pepperdine undergraduate students were hired in May to work on projects for Special Collections and University Archives.  Their work is a valuable contribution to our goal of making more archival collections available to researchers and more accessible online.

Craig Taylor spent five weeks with the department, working on a variety of collections.  He assisted with the ongoing effort to provide more detail to the M. Norvel and Helen Young papers by creating folder lists; helped move our boxes in storage to their permanent locations; assisted Archivist Katie Richardson with surveying the Jerry Weintraub Collection of Motion Picture and Television Program Reels; and rehoused, organized, and wrote a finding aid for the Gavin MacLeod Collection of Scripts.  (The Weintraub collection includes film reels from movies such as The Karate Kid [1984], The Avengers [1998], and others.  The MacLeod collection includes scripts from productions including The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Love Boat, and others.)

Myia Lane-Vickers continues her work through the summer, also on collections covering various topics.  She provided more detail by adding a folder list to the Churches of Christ Church Bulletins and Weekly Programs (covering churches in California, Oregon, and Texas), and is currently working on refoldering and listing scripts and production files from the Ivan Goff Collection of Television Scripts (including shows such as Mannix, The Rogues, and others).  A complete list of episodes will be online in the near future.

We appreciate the help of our student workers, and look forward to completing more projects with them in the future!  Special Collections and University Archives also welcomes interested students looking for internships with the department.  For more information about these collections, to view collection materials or perform research, or discuss internship opportunities, please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-4323.


Student workers Craig and Myia take a break from processing collections to highlight objects from the archives! (Click the image to view it larger.)


Limited Edition Pennyroyal Caxton Bible Acquired by Special Collections

Due to the generosity of Bruce and Suzie Kovner, Special Collections and University Archives acquired the Pennyroyal Caxton Bible. This edition of the King James Version of the Holy Bible is illustrated by Barry Moser, the foremost American master of wood engravings. It is the first illustrated Bible of its kind since Gustave Doré’s edition of the Le Saint Bible in 1865.

Published by the Pennyroyal Caxton Press in 1999, the edition is one of 400 printed copies taking a total of three years to complete. The Bible is bound in two volumes. Volume one contains the five books of Moses, the historical books and the books of poetry. Volume two contains the books of prophecy and the New Testament. The bindings are full limp vellum with the title stamped in 24-carat gold on the cover and spine. Each signature was folded by hand and sewn on vellum tapes. There are  a total of 233 illustrations in the Bible.

The design of the Pennyroyal Caxton Bible owes much to the past. The arrangement of double columns is similar to many other great Bibles including the Gutenberg Bible.

To view the Pennyroyal Caxton Bible please contact Katie Richardson, Archivist for Special Collections and University Archives at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-4323.

Pepperdine Students Conclude Special Collections Internship

Austin McElrath, Andrea Oates, and Sarah Dannemiller recently concluded their 15-week, for-credit internship during the spring 2013 semester.

Austin processed and created a finding aid for the Elinor Oswald Collection of Southern California Tourism Ephemera. The collection comprises a wide variety of tourist ephemera relating to Elinor Oswald’s professional career as a tour guide in the Southern California area between 1968 and 2009. The project included arranging and describing materials, writing a finding aid, and adding descriptive information to Archivists’ Toolkit. The finding aid is online and viewable by clicking here.

Andrea also processed and created a finding aid for a collection. She processed the John D. Nicks Jr. Papers. Nicks was a former professor, dean of the business school, vice president of academic affairs, and vice president of development at Pepperdine University from the 1970s to the 1990s. The project included arranging and describing materials, writing a finding aid, and adding descriptive information to Archivists’ Toolkit. The finding aid is now online and viewable by clicking here.

Sarah worked on two projects during the course of her internship. She enhanced the finding aid for the M. Norvel and Helen Young Papers. The Young papers are our single largest collection at 225.59 linear feet. Sarah described the collection in greater detail, adding folder level description to Archivists’ Toolkit and updating the finding aid. She also assisted the archivist with exhibit preparation for Bible Lectures. Sarah selected Churches of Christ hymnals to display and researched the hymnals to make captions.

Sarah had this to say about her internship experience in Special Collections:

After reflecting upon my experience as an intern I realized how I had underestimated the importance of an archivist’s work and also the amount of time that goes into a project. I thought that I had a legitimate reason as to why I should be selected to do this internship. I wrote a paper for my HIST 200 class that required the use of the university’s archives. I spent hours flipping through folders and papers that had little relevance to my research in order to find the “jackpot.” I thought there needed to be more organization and better detailed finding aids so I wasn’t spending all my precious research time flipping through folders. However, once I was assigned to creating a finding aid and expanding it I realized just how much time it took to create the bare minimum. I came to appreciate and to respect the time and effort that archivists put into making materials available for researchers, regardless of how much detail they put into the finding aids.

Not only did I gain a new appreciation for archival work but I also enjoyed the creative aspect of it. I was lucky enough to be interning at the same time that an exhibit for Pepperdine’s Bible Lectures was being set up. As a member of the Churches of Christ, the opportunity was great not just for my career but also for my spiritual involvement. I was excited to learn about my own tradition’s history and through what seemed like a personally edifying research process, felt like I was able to give something back to my church family. I was able to use my research skills as a historian and my creative capabilities to contribute something to an event that brings many Christians together in a spirit of unification and fellowship.

Sarah standing in front of the exhibit case she worked on.

For further questions about internships or Special Collections and University Archives holdings please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310)506-4323.

When the President came to Pepperdine: Today’s featured digital object

President Gerald Ford (right) greets actor John Wayne, with benefactor Richard Seaver (center)

On Founder’s Day, September 20, 1975, as Pepperdine University’s Malibu campus began its fourth year of activity, the university was honored by an official visit from the President of the United States, Gerald R. Ford. This was the first time a sitting President had visited Pepperdine, a milestone indicative of both the prestige the university had gained nationally and the ties its administration held with the Republican Party. The day was marked by two building dedications on the rapidly growing campus, both of which featured remarks by President Ford. A VIP brunch ceremony dedicated the Brock House, home to the university president, and this was followed by a public gathering of over 18,000 attendees to witness the dedication of the Firestone Fieldhouse, the campus’ athletics facility. Newly discovered and digitized, the audio recording of President Ford’s dedication of the Firestone Fieldhouse is now available online in our Historic Sound Recordings collection.

The 18,000 strong crowd at the Firestone Fieldhouse dedication, 1975

In addition to a twenty-minute speech by President Ford (on the important role of independent universities and free enterprise in the national education system), the recording also features the pomp and ritual particular to that era, including Pat Boone singing the national anthem and John Wayne leading a recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance.

Although it may not be apparent in this recording, President Ford’s visit to Pepperdine occurred during a period of heightened anxiety for both the president and the university. Just two weeks earlier, Squeaky Fromme, a follower of Charles Manson, had attempted to assassinate President Ford in Sacramento (the gun failed to discharge). Security at Pepperdine was intense and there were no incidents; however, just two days later, Sara Jane Moore fired on the president in San Francisco in a second failed attempt. Meanwhile, four days before President Ford was to arrive at Pepperdine, M. Norvel Young, Chancellor of Pepperdine University, crashed his car into another vehicle on the Pacific Coast Highway, causing the death of two motorists. The shadow of this tragedy nearly derailed the Presidential visit, but the event continued as planned.

In addition to listening to the recording, you can also view photographs of the day’s events. Enjoy.

It’s a WRAP: NHPRC Funded Project Concludes

March 31, 2013, concluded the eighteen month NHPRC funded project “Preserving the Past, Preparing, for the Future: Building Sustainable Archival Collections.” During the project, 1,370 linear feet of materials were processed comprising 103 collections. The finding aids for the collections can be accessed through the Online Archive of California.

Over the course of the grant, we had many people pitch in to get things done. Three student workers: Jenna Fry, Lindsey Gant, and Catie Golitzin; four interns: Alexandra Mogan, Austin McElrath, Andrea Oates, and Sarah Dannemiller; one cataloger: Casey Ann Mitchell; a graduate student assistant: Jessica Geiser; and three archivists: Jamie Henricks, Melissa Nykanen, and Katie Richardson all put in time to make sure the grant was a success. In addition to having collections organized following national standards and best practices, local policies were established in the archives to accession and maintain new collections going forward.

Collections processed and made available because of the grant:

1984 Olympics Collection

Associated Women for Pepperdine Records

Banowsky (William S.) Papers

Batchelder (Ronald W.) Papers

Casmir (Fred L.) Grade Books

Churches of Christ Church Programs and Weekly Bulletins

Crest Associates Records

Davenport (David) Papers

Derrick (Hubert G.) Papers

Fetzer (Joel S.) Papers

George Pepperdine College Records

Goff (Ivan) Collection of Television Scripts

Hahn (Kenneth) Collection

Herschensohn (Bruce) Papers

Holland (Harold E.) Papers

Hornbaker (Larry D.) Papers

Hughes (Norman) Papers

Johnson (B. Lamar) Papers

Kallis (Stanley M.) Scripts

Lovell (James L.) Papers

MacNair (C. Richard) Papers

Malibooz Collection

Malibu Property Ownership Record Books and Real Estate Property Indexes

Marowitz (Charles) Collection of the Malibu Stage Company

McCaleb (J.M.) Papers

Metcalf (Edwards H.) Papers

Miller (Donald V.) Papers

Moore (James C.) Papers

Morris M. Womack Research Materials on J.P. Sanders

National School Safety Center Records

Penrod (James I.) Papers

Pepperdine Ambassadors Council Records

Pepperdine Associates Records

Pepperdine Bible Lectures Collection

Pepperdine College Freedom Forum Records

Pepperdine (George) Family Papers

Pepperdine University Accreditation Collection

Pepperdine University Admissions and Enrollment Collection

Pepperdine University Alumni Association Records

Pepperdine University Annual Reports

Pepperdine University Archives Audiovisual Collection

Pepperdine University Archives Individual Files

Pepperdine University Archives Individual Photograph Files

Pepperdine University Archives Photographs, Negatives, and Slides

Pepperdine University Archives Publications

Pepperdine University Archives Subject Files

Pepperdine University Athletics Records

Pepperdine University Board of Regents Records

Pepperdine University Budget and Finance Collection

Pepperdine University Bulletins, Catalogs and Schedule of Classes

Pepperdine University Campaigns and Fundraising Collection

Pepperdine University Campus Dedications Collection

Pepperdine University Commencement Collection

Pepperdine University Computing Collection

Pepperdine University Convocations, Founder’s Day and Presidential Inaugurations collection

Pepperdine University Credits Committee Records

Pepperdine University Due Process Committee (DPC) Deliberations Records

Pepperdine University Faculty Collection

Pepperdine University Graduate School of Education and Psychology Records

Pepperdine University Graziadio School of Business and Management Records

Pepperdine University International Programs Records

Pepperdine University Libraries Records

Pepperdine University Management Committee (UMC) Records

Pepperdine University Office of Public Affairs Records

Pepperdine University Office of the Provost, Nancy Magnusson Fagan Records

Pepperdine University Office of the Provost, Steven S. Lemley Records

Pepperdine University Office of the Provost, William B. Adrian Records

Pepperdine University Operations Planning Committee (OPS) Records

Pepperdine University Performing and Fine Arts Collection

Pepperdine University Planning Committee (UPC) Records

Pepperdine University Plaques

Pepperdine University Policy Committee (UPOL) Records

Pepperdine University Real Estate Records

Pepperdine University School of Continuing Education Records

Pepperdine University School of Law Records

Pepperdine University School of Professional Studies and Los Angeles Campus Collection

Pepperdine University School of Public Policy Records

Pepperdine University Seaver College Records

Pepperdine University Speeches Collection

Pepperdine University Student Life Collection

Pepperdine University Women’s Organizations Collection

Pullias (Earl Vivon) Papers

Restoration Movement Publications

Rindge and Adamson family papers

The Roots of American Order Television Adaptation Proposal

Sanders (J.P.) Sermons

Seaver Academic Council Records

Seaver (Blanche Ebert and Frank R.) Papers

Seaver College Faculty Advisory Committee (FAC) Records

Sigmon (Loyd C.) Papers

Southern California Youth Citizenship Seminar Records

Student Government Association (SGA) Records

Thomas (Robert (Bob)) Papers

Tiner (Hugh M.) Papers

Tyler Ecology Award Records

University Academic Council Records

Wagner (Joseph) Papers

Webster Family Papers

White (Howard A.) Papers

Williams (Hanson A., Jr.) Collection of Photographs and Negatives

Wilson (John F.) Papers

Young (M. Norvel and Helen) Papers

Zeta Kappa Collection









Some of the member of the NHPRC team: Casey Ann Mitchell, Jessica Geiser, Katie Richardson, Sarah Dannemiller, Lindsey Gant, and Jamie Henricks)

For questions about the collections or the project please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-4323.


Lindsey Gant Selected as Library Outstanding Student Worker of the Year!

Lindsey Gant has worked in the library for the past two years. This year, she was not only selected as the Library Student Worker of the Year but she was also a finalist for Outstanding Student Worker for the entire university! Lindsey switched from working in the Digital Initiatives Department to working in Special Collections and University Archives last fall and has been a huge help.










(Lindsey with her award and fancy chocolates!)

Lindsey has worked on many important projects for us. We received a large grant from NHPRC to organize, describe, and make available our archival collections to students, faculty, staff, and the community. Lindsey has helped by assisting members of the Special Collections team with creating finding aids for at least eighteen collections. These finding aids are published online through the Online Archive of California.

Collections that Lindsey has worked on include:

Churches of Christ Church Programs and Weekly Bulletins 1948-1968

Fetzer (Joel S.) Papers 1983-2012

George Pepperdine College Records 1937-1970s

Morris M. Womack Research Materials on J.P. Sanders 1970s-1980s

Pepperdine University Accreditation Collection 1953-1993

Pepperdine University Archives Publications

Pepperdine University Bulletins, Catalogs and Schedule of Classes 1937-2012

Pepperdine University Convocations, Founder’s Day and Presidential Inaugurations collection 1958-2006

Pepperdine University Credits Committee Records 1967-1996

Pepperdine University Graziadio School of Business and Management Records 1968-2013

Pepperdine University Management Committee (UMC) Records 1992-2008

Pepperdine University Operations Planning Committee (OPS) Records 1974-1987

Pepperdine University Policy Committee (UPOL) Records 1983-1992

Pepperdine University School of Law Records 1969-2013

Pepperdine University School of Public Policy Records 1996-2013

Sanders (J.P.) Sermons 1973-1986

Sigmon (Loyd C.) Papers 1945-2008

Southern California Youth Citizenship Seminar Records 1983-2005

Lindsey also played a key role in preparing for our “Becoming America: An Exhibition of Colonial Documents” exhibit which was on display from October, 2012 to April, 2013. She did research for captions and helped with the layout of the materials.

She researched four of our Pepperdine audio recordings which needed to be digitized. She searched through old issues of the Graphic to locate information regarding their context to write about their significance. We submitted her descriptions to the California Audiovisual Preservation Project which digitizes recordings with statewide significance. All four recordings were selected for digitization based on Lindsey’s research, ability to make a strong case for their statewide significance, and need for preservation.

Lindsey also attended the 7th annual Los Angeles Archives Bazaar in October 2012. She served as a representative for our department answering questions about our collections and services that we provide.

(Lindsey and Katie Richardson exhibit some of the materials from Special Collections and University Archives at the Archives Bazaar)

Lindsey has been a wonderful employee. She has all of the qualities we look for in an amazing student worker. She is always on time, friendly, reliable, detail-oriented, flexible, and an excellent writer. She has a strong desire to preserve history for future generations and is passionate about what our department does.  If you see Lindsey around campus, please congratulate her on this award!

For questions about Special Collections and University Archives or job opportunities in the department, please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu

Sigma Tau Delta Donates Rare Book to Special Collections

On April 9, 2013, during the New Member Installation Ceremony for Sigma Tau Delta (the English National Honor Society on campus) the society presented Special Collections with a rare book to add to its holdings. This year, all of the proceeds raised from a St. Patrick’s Day bake sale went to the acquisition of a book for the department. The officers and the faculty sponsor decided to select a text by an Irish writer to keep with the theme of the bake sale. They picked a 1906 edition of Oscar Wilde’s Salome (Bodley Head published) with illustrations by Aubrey Beardsley.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

( Picture of the cover)


(Members of Sigma Tau Delta and faculty sponsor Julie Smith)

To see the new addition please contact Katie Richardson, Archivist for Special Collections and University Archives at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-4323.

 

Senior Chemistry Student Presents Honors Thesis Defense on Payson Library Indoor Air Quality

Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library.  I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area.  What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center.  Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books.  The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days.  (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels.  Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library.  Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials).  Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified.  This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment.  While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place!  The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.  Congratulations Tom!







Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library. I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area. What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

 

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center. Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

 

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

 

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books. The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days. (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels. Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

 

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library. Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

 

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials). Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

 

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified. This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment. While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place! The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

 

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.

Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library.   I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area.  What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center.  Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books.  The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days.  (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels.  Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library.  Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials).  Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified.  This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment.  While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place!  The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.

4th and 5th Graders Visit Payson Library

On March 12, 2013, twenty-six 4th and 5th grade students from Open Classroom Leadership Magnet in Thousand Oaks, CA visited Pepperdine University. During their tour of the campus, they stopped by Payson Library to look at the exhibit “Becoming America: An Exhibition of Colonial Documents” on display through the end of March. The students were able to connect what they learned in the classroom with the materials on display.

Katie Richardson, Archivist for Special Collections and University Archives had the following to say about the tour: “It was great to show the students the materials and see a few of them get excited about what was on display. We have a document with King George III’s signature on it. One student came up to me and asked, ‘Is that really his signature?’ At which point I responded yes. Her eyes lit up and she said ‘Cool!’  I’m so happy some of the students were really able to connect with the materials.”

The students also had the opportunity to tour the surfboard room. The room includes 30 historic surfboards on loan from local Malibu resident John Mazza.

“I think the students were really excited about seeing the surfboards. They asked some really great questions. How old are the boards? Why are they so big? How did they get their names? My favorite question was from a student who asked, ‘Are any of the boards based on Harry Potter?’ When I told her the boards were older than Harry Potter she seemed pretty impressed.”


For more information about exhibits or tours of the library please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or Ken LaZebnik at ken.lazebnik@pepperdine.edu.