Tag Archives: students

Exhibit on the Early Years at George Pepperdine College Opens in Payson Library

This blog post was written by Lindsey Sommer, Special Collections and University Archives Intern.

September 6, 1972, marked the first day of class for students at Pepperdine University in Malibu. Prior to that time, the campus was located in the Vermont Knolls area of Los Angeles, a few miles south of downtown. Students at George Pepperdine College were involved in all sorts of activities. Some wrote for the student newspaper the Graphic, while others were involved in theatre, athletics, fraternities, or sororities. On display are a variety of materials illustrating students at George Pepperdine College from 1937 to the 1960s, participating in these activities, shown through historic photographs, newspaper clippings, documents, scrapbooks, uniforms and memorabilia. The exhibit is divided into four sections: 1. General Student Life, 2. Athletics, 3. Performing Arts, and 4. Sororities and Fraternities.

Section 1: General Student Life

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Homecoming images, such as the one seen here from 1961, show potential homecoming queens arrayed on the lawn at Pepperdine College. Also on display are images of student photographers for the Graphic, and an early Beanie worn by students attending Pepperdine college.

 

 

Section 2: Athletics

pepperdine.contentdm.oclc.orgThe athletics case features Football memorabilia and photographs, featuring men’s NCAA football team (seen here in 1946-1947) as well as an image of the women’s intramural football team. Additionally, on display is an original Pep Club uniform from 1939 and programs from men’s football games.

 

Section 3: Performing Arts

pepperdine.contentdm.oclc.orgAdditionally, on view are several programs and historic photographs showing student participation in the fine arts, such as an image from the 1959 production of the King and I, which can be seen with the original program. Viewers may also see original art show announcements and images of the Pepperdine College singing group the Singing Travelers.

 

Section 4: Sororities and Fraternities.

pepperdine.contentdm.oclc.orgFinally, a selection of memorabilia and photographs show students participating in Greek life at Pepperdine College, with scrapbooks, rush pins, and fraternity mugs. For example, in the photograph to the left, pledges can be seen pushing marbles down a corridor in Baxter Hall in 1942.

 

For further questions about the exhibit or internships in Special Collections and University Archives please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or 310-506-4323.

 

Winners of Pepperdine’s First Library Research Award are Announced

The three winners of the first annual Library Research Award went far beyond library basics to utilize many of the unique resources, collections, and services that the Pepperdine University Libraries provide. From archival boxes and obscure conference proceedings, to newspaper databases and InfoGuides, these students used the library to its fullest extent. The students drafted exhaustive literature reviews based on the sources most relevant to their research questions, and all three also conducted original analysis of information found within the library’s collections. Their winning essays and projects demonstrate the value of effective library research in academics.

Wil Fisher was the winner of the Best Undergraduate Student Project award for his project, Public Opinion Toward Bike Lanes: The Case of New York City. During the course of his research, Wil found sources in every nook and cranny of the library, both physical and virtual. He utilized at least 125 different sources, an open access dataset, Interlibrary Loan and Camino Resource Sharing, databases, online journals, e-books, and the Payson Library book stacks. Wil used his library research as a foundation for statistical analysis and personal interviews. Throughout this process, Wil followed an effective research strategy that resulted in a well-documented paper and poster.

Sarah Dannemiller won the award for the Best Use of Special Collections and University Archives for her project, Associated Women for Pepperdine: Enriching a Legacy. Her research involved detailed hands-on analysis of unique primary sources in four collections in the University Archives. Sarah contextualized and enriched her archival research with a variety of primary and secondary sources identified through interviews, databases, indexes, and bibliographies.

Alex Booker, winner in the Honorable Mention category, combined effective library research with his own original qualitative and quantitative research to write a paper entitled Finding a Frame that Fits: Analyzing Rival Framing of American Gun Control Policy in 2013. He searched multiple databases to identify journal articles for a literature review, crafted complex search terms to find newspaper articles for content analysis, and even utilized an e-book to learn how to use data calculation software.

We will honor Wil, Sarah, and Alex at a reception in the Great Books Room in Payson Library on Tuesday, April 15th, from 4-5pm. We hope you will join us to hear more about the students’ library research.

Payson Library Hosts Game Night

Tournament winners Cyrus Reynolds and Michael Hart

Super Smash Brothers Brawl winners Cyrus Reynolds and Michael Hart.  Reynolds also won the Mario Kart tournament.

The Kresge Room of Payson Library was packed on Thursday, March 27 when the library hosted its first game night. The main draws were tournaments in the Wii favorites Super Smash Brothers Brawl and Mario Kart, but other games like Just Dance, Monopoly, and Apples to Apples were popular as well.

From 7pm to midnight, over 50 students battled each other for bragging rights and movie passes. After 35 matches, Cyrus Reynolds and Michael Hart took first place in the Smash Brothers double elimination tournament. Reynolds proved to be a double threat, as he also emerged victorious in the Mario Kart competition.

The event was the brainchild of librarian Paul Stenis, who had heard from students about Smash Bros. competitions happening in the dorms, and thought it would be a great way to bring the community together in the library, and hopefully help students make new friends.

Pizza, desserts, and cardboard Wii controllers filled with Gummi Bears were provided for the lucky students in attendance.

Special thanks to library staff Kimberly Chan, Jaimie Beth Colvin, Gail Lukavic, Mary Ann Naumann, Marc Vinyard, and Allen Wessels, whose invaluable efforts made Game Night a success.

Plans are being made for more Game Nights in the future, with the next to take place over Pepperdine’s Welcome Weekend in the fall. If you are interested in learning more about this and other events at Pepperdine Libraries, you can contact Jeanette.Woodburn@pepperdine.edu.

Apply for the Library Research Award to Win Up to $500

Library Research Award PosterThe Pepperdine University Libraries are pleased to announce the first annual Library Research Award for students! This award of up to $500 will be given in several categories for the best scholarly or creative student projects that utilize library resources, collections, and services, in order to recognize the importance of effective library research in academics. The deadline to apply is March 31st, 2014.

Students are eligible to apply if they have used ANY print or online library resources, services, or tools in an academic project. A variety of project formats will be accepted, including research papers, films, musical compositions, lesson plans, short stories and others. In addition to submitting their project, students are asked to submit a reflective essay describing the role of the library in their research process and a bibliography.

If you are a full-time Pepperdine student at Seaver, GSEP, GSBM, or SPP and you have used library resources effectively in one of your projects, YOU are eligible to apply! The submission guidelines can be found here: http://infoguides.pepperdine.edu/libraryresearchaward.

If you have any questions, please contact Melissa Nykanen at (310) 506-4434 or at melissa.nykanen@pepperdine.edu.

Pepperdine Digital Commons reaches the half-million downloads milestone

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Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce that Pepperdine Digital Commons has passed 500,000 total downloads! New Year’s resolution: 1 million downloads by 2015. Pepperdine Digital Commons is the university’s centralized platform for Pepperdine journals, faculty websites, conference proceedings, exemplary student research, and other e-scholarship. It is our mission to make Pepperdine’s scholarly output accessible, secure, and search engine optimized for online discovery.

The most popular paper of 2013 was What Happens to Our Facebook Accounts When We Die?: Probate Versus Policy and the Fate of Social-Media Assets Postmortem by Kristina Sherry published in the Pepperdine Law Review (5,818 downloads). While the law journal material did very well, many other heavy hitters came from the School of Public Policy and Seaver College, such as Jesus and the Syrophoenician Woman: A Case Study in Inclusiveness by Holly J. Carey published in Leaven (1,234 downloads).

Check out Pepperdine Digital Commons for yourself or find out how the service can work for you.

Happy New Year from Pepperdine University Libraries!

Classical guitar concert series comes to Payson’s Surfboard Room

“Welcome to our boardroom,” remarked Mark Roosa, Pepperdine University’s Dean of Libraries, in reference to the thirty-odd surfboards that lined the walls of the chapel-like space in Payson Library that would serve as recital hall for the evening. Dean Roosa was introducing renowned classical guitarist Christopher Parkening, whose students would be performing for this, the first in a series of Guitar Program concerts held the second Tuesday of every month in the Surfboard Room of Payson Library.

Maestro Parkening, who serves as Distinguished Professor of Music at Pepperdine University, set the tone for the evening by showing a short film about his guitar teacher, the great Andrés Segovia. In addition to introducing the themes of pedagogy, legacy, and musical inheritance, the film demonstrated how Maestro Segovia was a pivotal figure in elevating the status of the guitar, earning its place on the stage and in the classical repertoire.

Following the film, eight of Maestro Parkening’s students performed in succession, each framed by the colonnade-like rows of surfboards composing the John Mazza Historic Surfboard collection. It’s hard to say what role the surfboards played in the surprisingly pleasing acoustics of the room—both intimate and expansive—that served the guitarists so well. The repertoire ranged from the sixteenth century to the twenty-first, and was well received by the near capacity audience. The concert concluded with four guitarist performing Pachelbel’s “Loose Canon,” a humorous take on that famous (and overplayed) Baroque canon by Johann Pachelbel as arranged by the Los Angeles String Quartet. The familiar tune made its way on an unexpected journey of musical styles, including reggae, bluegrass, flamenco, and even punk.

The students in performance included Sergio Gallardo, Joshua Ivy, Roberto Hermosillo, Brig Urias, Sebastian Olarte, Joseph Peliska, Alexander Park, and Kevin Enstrom. The photo above by Patrick Park shows Sergio Gallardo beginning the concert with Saudade No. 3 by French composer Roland Dyens.

The next concert in the series will be Tuesday, October 8, at 5 pm.  Once again in the Surfboard Room on the second floor of Payson Library.


Guitarists warm up in the Special Collections Reading Room adjacent to the Surfboard Room in Payson Library





Pepperdine Students Make Progress on Archival Collections

Two Pepperdine undergraduate students were hired in May to work on projects for Special Collections and University Archives.  Their work is a valuable contribution to our goal of making more archival collections available to researchers and more accessible online.

Craig Taylor spent five weeks with the department, working on a variety of collections.  He assisted with the ongoing effort to provide more detail to the M. Norvel and Helen Young papers by creating folder lists; helped move our boxes in storage to their permanent locations; assisted Archivist Katie Richardson with surveying the Jerry Weintraub Collection of Motion Picture and Television Program Reels; and rehoused, organized, and wrote a finding aid for the Gavin MacLeod Collection of Scripts.  (The Weintraub collection includes film reels from movies such as The Karate Kid [1984], The Avengers [1998], and others.  The MacLeod collection includes scripts from productions including The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Love Boat, and others.)

Myia Lane-Vickers continues her work through the summer, also on collections covering various topics.  She provided more detail by adding a folder list to the Churches of Christ Church Bulletins and Weekly Programs (covering churches in California, Oregon, and Texas), and is currently working on refoldering and listing scripts and production files from the Ivan Goff Collection of Television Scripts (including shows such as Mannix, The Rogues, and others).  A complete list of episodes will be online in the near future.

We appreciate the help of our student workers, and look forward to completing more projects with them in the future!  Special Collections and University Archives also welcomes interested students looking for internships with the department.  For more information about these collections, to view collection materials or perform research, or discuss internship opportunities, please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-4323.


Student workers Craig and Myia take a break from processing collections to highlight objects from the archives! (Click the image to view it larger.)


Senior Chemistry Student Presents Honors Thesis Defense on Payson Library Indoor Air Quality

Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library.  I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area.  What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center.  Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books.  The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days.  (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels.  Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library.  Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials).  Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified.  This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment.  While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place!  The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.  Congratulations Tom!







Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library. I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area. What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

 

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center. Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

 

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

 

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books. The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days. (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels. Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

 

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library. Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

 

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials). Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

 

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified. This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment. While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place! The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

 

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.

Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library.   I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area.  What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center.  Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books.  The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days.  (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels.  Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library.  Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials).  Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified.  This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment.  While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place!  The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.

Student life 25 years ago today: Today’s featured digital object

In February of 1988, Pepperdine University’s alumni newspaper, The Pepperdine Voice, featured a photo spread titled “A Day in the Life of Pepperdine University.” The introductory text read:

“On Thursday, Jan. 7, 1988, seven photographers were deployed to scour all areas of campus to capture the daily activities of Pepperdine on film…What sort of day was Jan. 7? It was an ordinary day in Pepperdine life, and that is why it was chosen—to show the miracle of the mundane—students, faculty and staff at work, at play, in solitude and in action.”

The original prints and negatives produced for this project are now housed in our University Archives and were recently scanned for the University Archives Photograph (digital) Collection. Continuing our celebration of 40 years in Malibu, I encourage you to view this photographic time capsule of student life in the ‘80s. Technology and fashion may have changed, but I think you’ll agree that the “Waves spirit” captured in these photos is timeless.

View the slideshow, or explore these photos in our digital collections.

Happy New Year!

Today’s featured digital object: Pepperdine’s 1987 Rose Parade float

As Founder’s Day 2012 draws to a close Pepperdine University’s 75th anniversary celebration, we thought we’d revisit another great milestone in Pepperdine’s history, it’s 50th anniversary celebrations from 1987. One of the crowning achievements of those celebrations was Pepperdine’s entry of a float into the 98th Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, California. The theme of the float was “The Quest for Atlantis,” a Classical theme reflecting Pepperdine’s quest for academic excellence. Pepperdine Digital Collections is pleased to announce the launch of a new digital collection that captures this moment in Pepperdine’s history: Pepperdine’s Rose Parade Photo Album.

The collection is based on a selection of photographs, both formal and candid, digitized from a photo album provided by Hung Le, one of the eight students chosen to ride on the float as representatives of Pepperdine. Each photo tells a piece of Pepperdine’s Rose Parade story, from the genesis of the idea, to the hours of float decorating, to the parade itself. Based on an oral history with Hung Le, now Associate Vice President and University Registrar at Pepperdine, it’s a story about our university coming together as a community to celebrate a milestone—much as we have this last year with the 75th anniversary. This collection also offers a fascinating look behind the scenes at the Rose Parade, an annual 2-hour event that requires months of planning and preparations.

Click the link above to browse the collection. Enjoy!