Tag Archives: students

Senior Chemistry Student Presents Honors Thesis Defense on Payson Library Indoor Air Quality

Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library.  I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area.  What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center.  Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books.  The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days.  (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels.  Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library.  Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials).  Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified.  This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment.  While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place!  The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.  Congratulations Tom!







Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library. I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area. What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

 

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center. Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

 

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

 

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books. The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days. (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels. Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

 

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library. Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

 

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials). Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

 

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified. This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment. While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place! The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

 

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.

Over the past three years, senior chemistry major Tom Boundy has been researching air quality in Payson Library.   I met him earlier this year when he stopped by Special Collections to check sensors placed in the rare book storage area.  What I didn’t know at the time was that his tests were part of a larger project, spanning three years!

Last week I was able to attend Tom’s Honors chemistry thesis defense seminar held in the Keck Science Center.  Students, professors, and I listened to his presentation, “Determination of Volatile Aldehydes and Ketones in Payson Library Air.”

Tom’s advisor, Dr. Jane Ganske, described his project briefly as addressing “the indoor air quality of a library environment, as well as [providing] a broader understanding of factors that play a role in the air we breathe indoors.”

In his research, he found that other studies explored off-gassing from books and the impact on health and preservation of museum collections, and the studies searched for evidence of ketones (more often aldehydes than ketones) and other chemicals, but not ones specifically known to actually come from books.  The Payson Library study used the passive sampling method of studying primary and secondary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in library air, by leaving a test strip in one location for seven days.  (Primary VOCs are emitted directly from material surfaces, such as off-gassing from newly installed wood panels.  Secondary VOCs are formed through reactions with air, happening indoors.)

In the study, samples were taken over multiple years and primarily above the book stacks in the circulating collections area on the first floor of Payson Library.  Other air samples were taken around the university to compare against the Payson Library air, including in Special Collections storage in Payson Library (where there is a higher concentration of books in a smaller, more enclosed environment), in the weight room inside Firestone Fieldhouse (materials in the room are primarily metal and rubber), and in classroom 130 of Keck Science Center (a typical classroom).

Formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde found; this is commonly found in bonded wood products (such as in construction materials).  Other aldehydes and ketones found were known byproducts of building materials, air fresheners, books and paper products, perfumes, and even human skin oil!

As a result of the research project, 21 compounds were identified and 18 were successfully quantified.  This is the largest range found in any library study, which is a great accomplishment.  While I am personally familiar with certain chemical properties of paper – I took a class about preservation of heritage materials while studying to earn my library degree – I never knew there was such a range of reactions taking place!  The presentation was eye-opening, and I hope that another intrepid student will build on the work done in Payson Library.

Tom is also presenting his research as a poster presentation next week at the American Chemical Society national meeting and exposition in New Orleans.

Student life 25 years ago today: Today’s featured digital object

In February of 1988, Pepperdine University’s alumni newspaper, The Pepperdine Voice, featured a photo spread titled “A Day in the Life of Pepperdine University.” The introductory text read:

“On Thursday, Jan. 7, 1988, seven photographers were deployed to scour all areas of campus to capture the daily activities of Pepperdine on film…What sort of day was Jan. 7? It was an ordinary day in Pepperdine life, and that is why it was chosen—to show the miracle of the mundane—students, faculty and staff at work, at play, in solitude and in action.”

The original prints and negatives produced for this project are now housed in our University Archives and were recently scanned for the University Archives Photograph (digital) Collection. Continuing our celebration of 40 years in Malibu, I encourage you to view this photographic time capsule of student life in the ‘80s. Technology and fashion may have changed, but I think you’ll agree that the “Waves spirit” captured in these photos is timeless.

View the slideshow, or explore these photos in our digital collections.

Happy New Year!

Today’s featured digital object: Pepperdine’s 1987 Rose Parade float

As Founder’s Day 2012 draws to a close Pepperdine University’s 75th anniversary celebration, we thought we’d revisit another great milestone in Pepperdine’s history, it’s 50th anniversary celebrations from 1987. One of the crowning achievements of those celebrations was Pepperdine’s entry of a float into the 98th Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, California. The theme of the float was “The Quest for Atlantis,” a Classical theme reflecting Pepperdine’s quest for academic excellence. Pepperdine Digital Collections is pleased to announce the launch of a new digital collection that captures this moment in Pepperdine’s history: Pepperdine’s Rose Parade Photo Album.

The collection is based on a selection of photographs, both formal and candid, digitized from a photo album provided by Hung Le, one of the eight students chosen to ride on the float as representatives of Pepperdine. Each photo tells a piece of Pepperdine’s Rose Parade story, from the genesis of the idea, to the hours of float decorating, to the parade itself. Based on an oral history with Hung Le, now Associate Vice President and University Registrar at Pepperdine, it’s a story about our university coming together as a community to celebrate a milestone—much as we have this last year with the 75th anniversary. This collection also offers a fascinating look behind the scenes at the Rose Parade, an annual 2-hour event that requires months of planning and preparations.

Click the link above to browse the collection. Enjoy!

Introducing Pepperdine Digital Commons: New online publishing platform for Pepperdine scholarship

It’s here!

Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce the launch of Pepperdine Digital Commons, the university’s new centralized platform for Pepperdine journals, faculty webpages, conference proceedings, and exemplary student research. Pepperdine Digital Commons is a digital repository and publication platform designed to collect, preserve, and make accessible the academic output of Pepperdine faculty, students, staff, and affiliates. It is the mission of Pepperdine Digital Commons to facilitate the discovery of Pepperdine’s scholarly communications, provide instant access to full text works, and preserve these materials in an open, digital environment.

Who can submit content?

Pepperdine University faculty, staff, students, organizations or departments, or individuals or groups sponsored by or closely affiliated with Pepperdine University.

What can go in it?

Original, creative work that is scholarly in nature, research oriented, or of institutional significance. Pepperdine Digital Commons accepts a wide range of file formats (including text files, datasets, audio files, and video files) and there is no formal limit to size of material.

Why use it?

Pepperdine Digital Commons is a centralized repository that enables Pepperdine faculty, students, and staff to share their work and get it discovered by the wider academic community. Items in Pepperdine Digital Commons are search engine optimized, meaning that they appear high in the search results of sites like Google. Furthermore, authors and editors receive regular download reports and have access to Google Analytics.

It’s live now, so check it out.

Follow this link for more information on Pepperdine Digital Commons. Thanks!

Pepperdine’s Spirit of Service: Today’s featured digital object

As we approach the tenth anniversary of the September 11th attacks this Sunday, now officially a National Day of Service and Remembrance, it seems appropriate to revisit the history of volunteerism at Pepperdine University. As a Christian university, service is the central pillar in Pepperdine’s mission to prepare students for lives of “purpose, service, and leadership.” This spirit of service is epitomized this weekend with Step Forward Day, Pepperdine’s annual day of service now in its 23rd year.

Student volunteers on the Malibu Pier, 1984

In this photo, we see Pepperdine students preparing to paint the Malibu pier, a community service project organized in 1984. We’ve compiled a selection of photos like this one from our University Archives Photograph Collection that demonstrate Pepperdine’s history of volunteerism, going all the way back to the early days of George Pepperdine College in southwestern Los Angeles. Click here to browse this compilation.

The photos in this compilation capture Pepperdine students serving their country at war, both as soldiers and as home front supporters; serving their local communities through beautification projects and disaster response; and serving children through outreach initiatives. There are also a few group photos of Pepperdine service organizations through the years (can you spot the ‘80s hairstyles?) and images from Pepperdine sponsored community service projects, such as the Foster Grandparents program. Enjoy.