Tag Archives: history


Pepperdine during World War II: Remembering “On the Beam”

On_the_beam_graphicIn September of 1944, as Allied efforts in World War II neared crescendo, George Pepperdine College (GPC) reported 350 students in service to the nation. Total enrollment at the time was only 418. Many students, such as basketball star June Tuggle, put their education on hold to serve in the armed forces. As a labor of love, GPC basketball coach Al O. Duer started a monthly newsletter called On the Beam in order to maintain communications with GPC students and alumni serving in the U.S. Armed Forces during the Second World War. Carrying the motto “Dedicated to Young Pepperdiners in the Service,” the newsletter ran from June 1943 to at least January 1946. Coach Duer, who edited the newsletter, often closed his monthly message with: “Keep those chins up and stay ‘on the beam’.” The publication included news updates about student and alumni wartime activities and deployments, including photographs and contact information. On the Beam was a critical resource for GPC students, faculty, and friends on the home front who sent letters and care packages to the troops overseas. The newsletter claimed a circulation of 4,500 by July 1945.

Of course, not every GPC student would return from the war. In February 1945, On the Beam retroactively reported the death of Pfc. June Tuggle, the first Pepperdine casualty of the war. There would be five others: Robert Carter, Bruce Munday, Charles Stivers, Hugh McCullough, and Jack Slade. In this 70th anniversary year of Allied victory in World War II—and on this Veteran’s Day—Pepperdine University Libraries are pleased to announce the fully searchable online publication of On the Beam in Pepperdine Digital Collections. We extend a very grateful thanks to Pepperdine veterans of past and present, and to all veterans everywhere.

Cover of "On the Beam," May 1945

Cover of “On the Beam,” May 1945

Photo spread of GPC servicemen in "On the Beam"

Photo spread of GPC servicemen in “On the Beam”

Database Trial: Adam Matthew Primary Source Collections

Pepperdine University Libraries is now trialing a number of primary source collections from Adam Matthew Digital. Trial access is available through November 20th to these collections:

African American Communities

This collection presents aspects of the African American community through personal diaries and scrapbooks, pamphlets, newspapers and periodicals, correspondence, official records and in-depth oral histories, revealing the prevalent challenges of racism, discrimination and integration, and a unique African American culture and identity.


American History 1493-1945 (Modules I & II)

This collection of documents brings to life American History from the times of the earliest settlers until the end of World War II. It is divided into two modules.
Module I: Settlement, Commerce, Revolution and Reform: 1493-1859
Module II: Civil War, Reconstruction and the Modern Era: 1860-1945.


Empire Online

This collection has been developed to encourage undergraduates, postgraduates, and researchers to explore colonial history, politics, culture and society. Sources include exploration journals, letters, government papers, memoirs, and maps.


Everyday Life and Women in America

The collection offers insights into the conduct of life and domestic management literature from 1800-1920, offering primary source materials on the daily lives of women and men, as well as emphasizing contrasts in regional, urban and rural cultures. Primary sources in this collection include monographs, pamphlets, and periodicals.


Global Commodities

This collection focuses on fifteen commodities and the ways they transformed the world. The commodities covered are: Chocolate, Coffee, Cotton, Fur, Oil, Opium, Porcelain, Silver & Gold, Spices, Sugar, Tea, Timber, Tobacco, Wheat, Wine & Spirits.


Popular Culture in Britain and America, 1950-1975

This collection documents popular culture in Britain and America from 1950 to 1975 and covers issues such as the Civil Rights Movement, youth culture, the Space Race, and the Vietnam War.


Popular Medicine in America, 1800-1900

This collection offers visual primary source material, such as advertisements and popular texts, on the topic of medicine in America from 1800-1900. The primary sources in this collection are materials that were designed for the general public, including writings on preventative medicine and medical educational texts.


Database Trial: Latin American Newspapers

Pepperdine University Libraries is now trialing Latin American Newspapers: Series I & Series II, modules of the World Newspaper Archive (launched by CRL). Trial access is available until May 8.

These resources provide online access to more than 50 newspapers published in Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, and Venezuela between 1805 and 1922.

Through eyewitness reporting, editorials, legislative information, letters, poetry, advertisements, matrimony notices, and obituaries, these newspapers chronicle the evolution of Latin American culture and daily life over two centuries and provide wide perspectives from diverse Latin American cultures.

Series I contains more than 1.2 million pages of content, including:

  • El Mercurio (1914–22) – An important Spanish-language paper published in Santiago, often considered Chile’s newspaper of record.
  • O Estado de São Paulo (1876–1922) – This title (published as A Provincia de São Paulo until 1889) traces Brazil’s history from an empire to a republic, and stands as one of Brazil’s premiere newspapers.
  • La Prensa (Buenos Aires, Argentina) (1869–1922) – This title, founded in 1869 by Dr. Jose Clemente Paz, was considered among the most significant newspapers in the world by the turn of the century.
  • Mexican Herald (1895–1915) – An English-language title bringing international and local news to the American expatriate community in Mexico.

Series II deepens coverage of countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, and Mexico, and includes papers from areas not covered in Series I such as Bolivia, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Belize.

Access Latin American Newspapers: Series I here and Latin American Newspapers: Series II here.


New for 2015 in Project Muse

The following journals, previously announced as joining Project MUSE, are now online:

** From the Liverpool University Press:  European Journal of Language Policy

Published by Liverpool University Press, in association with the Conseil europen pour les langues/European Language Council, the journal aims to address major developments in language policy from a European perspective, regarding multilingualism and the diversity of languages as valuable assets in the culture, politics and economics of twenty-first century societies.

** From the Duke University Press:  Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture

The Journal of Chinese Literature and Culture publishes research on premodern Chinese literature and all aspects of the broader literary culture. It also explores the influence of traditional literature and culture in modern and contemporary China. Jointly sponsored by Peking University and the University of Illinois, the journal is committed to an international editorial vision and to in-depth exchange and collaboration among scholars in China, the U.S., and around the world.

** From the University of Nebraska Press:   Middle West Review

The Middle West Review is an interdisciplinary journal about the American Midwest and the only publication dedicated exclusively to the study of the Midwest as a region. It provides a forum for scholars and nonscholars alike to explore the contested meanings of Midwestern identity, history, geography, society, culture, and politics.


New Exhibit Images of the Korean War: One Soldier’s Perspective Opens this Month at Payson Library

Williams (right) on the front 1952

Hanson (right) on the front, 1952.

Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce a new exhibition highlighting the Korean War photos taken by Hanson Williams Jr., a 1950 graduate of Pepperdine, who received a photography scholarship to attend the university. Six months after his graduation, he was drafted by the United States Army and was stationed in California for one year before being deployed to Korea to serve as a war photographer. In this capacity, he often photographed soldiers in combat, special events, and visiting dignitaries such as generals, politicians, and celebrities. Williams recalled carrying his personal camera with him every day, and even resorted to developing film in rivers and rice paddies when necessary. In addition to his military duties, Williams tried to get a better understanding of the country and its people. He would spend his spare time riding his bike into remote locations and photograph such things as local villagers and their farms. Williams spent 13 months in Korea traveling to cities such as Seoul, Incheon, and Taegu.

Korean man 1952

A photo Hanson took while in Korea, 1952.

The exhibit serves as Williams’s visual diary showing his journey from basic training at Fort Ord in Monterey, CA to his time served in Korea. Many of the photos taken by Williams during his spare time in remote villages have never been exhibited before. The materials will be on display on the first floor of Payson Library until April 15th . The exhibit is viewable during library open hours. For questions about the exhibit please contact Katie Richardson, Archivist for Special Collections and University Archives, at 310-506-4323 or katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu.

 A reception for the exhibit will take on February 21st from 12-2. If you are interested in attending the event, please RSVP to Jeanette Woodburn, Director of Library Advancement at 310-506-6785 or Jeanette.Woodburn@pepperdine.edu.

Special thanks to Special Collections and University Archives interns and student workers Emily Hansen, Sophie Zhu, and Candice Erdos for all of their help preparing for this exhibit.

Emily prepping

Emily prepping for the exhibit.


Candice assisting with exhibit installation.



Pepperdine’s Fight against Communism: Announcing the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum digital collection

Freedom Forum luncheon in the Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles, 1960

Freedom Forum luncheon in the Biltmore Hotel, Los Angeles, 1960

The Pepperdine College Freedom Forum was an annual, three-day seminar designed to promote American values as a defense against communism, held in Los Angeles between 1959 and 1971. The model for the Freedom Forum grew out of the National Education Program developed by George S. Benson, President of Harding College. At Pepperdine, President M. Norvel Young carried the idea forward, where it was sometimes referred to as the California Freedom Forum. The Freedom Forum was part of a larger constellation of anti-communist activities at Pepperdine College, which included a weekly Speaker’s Bureau, an anti-communist film series, and various citizen education and teacher training programs.

Billed as a “seminar to prepare leadership for American resistance to the spread of Communism and Socialism,” the inaugural Freedom Forum in 1959 featured talks such as “Communism’s Invisible Weapon—Brainwashing” and “What Socialism Has Delivered in Europe.” The featured speaker that first year was Senator John L. McClellan, who delivered the keynote “Can American Freedom Survive?” before a packed house of 800 California business leaders in the ballroom of the Biltmore Hotel.

Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce that hundreds of program booklets, typed speeches, photographs, newspaper clippings, and interviews from all thirteen years of the Freedom Forum are now available to researchers and the interested public through the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum digital collection. This collection is a digitized subset of the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum Records available for research in our Special Collections and University Archives located in Payson Library on the Malibu campus.

Richard Arens of the House Committe on Un-American Activities speaking at the 1959 Freedom Forum

Richard Arens of the House Committe on Un-American Activities speaking at the 1959 Freedom Forum

Program cover featuring Senator Barry Goldwater, 1961

Program cover featuring Senator Barry Goldwater, 1961

Don McCulloch presenting on Communism and brainwashing at the 1959 Freedom Forum

Don McCulloch presenting on Communism and brainwashing at the 1959 Freedom Forum

New Malibu matchbook and postcard collection online

Lighthouse cafe matchcoverAccording to the New York Times, “Close Cover Before Striking” is the most printed phrase in the history of the printed word. Perhaps you remember the days when every business, it seemed, advertised its services via free matchbooks bearing a logo, address, and phone number. Matchbook cover advertising rose and fell with the popularity of cigarette smoking, and was all but obliterated by the advent of the cheap, disposable Bic lighter in the early 1970s. Although customized matchboxes have made a bit of a comeback recently (think high-end restaurants), the heyday for the matchbook cover remains in the past, charting a visual history of midcentury American culture and commerce.

Pepperdine University Libraries are pleased to announce the Eric Wienberg Collection of Malibu Matchbooks and Postcards, the latest addition to the Pepperdine Digital Collections. This online collection includes over forty matchbook covers that chronicle the history of business establishments and sites in Malibu and the surrounding area. The collection covers a period between the 1930s and the 1980s, and features matchbook covers from restaurants, cafes, bars, hotels, motels, stores, and other businesses from Malibu, Topanga, Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica, Culver City, and Venice Beach. The matchbooks and postcards were collected and generously donated by former Malibu resident Eric Wienberg.

The digital collection allows users to view both sides of the matchbook cover, either individually or side-by-side. Many businesses used the underside of the cover for hidden images or jokes, in addition to further details about their services (see below). The user can also see the matchbook cover on a map showing the business’ original location, or take a west to east tour of these historical businesses along the Pacific Coast Highway via the Library’s Historypin.com channel.

Return to a time when Alice’s Restaurant graced the Malibu Pier, when Duke’s Malibu was known as the Las Flores Inn, when lovers rendezvoused at the Albatross Hotel, and when Pacific Palisades had the Lighthouse café (and a working lighthouse). Enjoy.

Underside of Malibu Beach Motor Inn match cover

Underside of Malibu Beach Motor Inn match cover

Screenshot of matchbook covers in Historypin.com tour

Screenshot of matchbook covers in Historypin.com tour


Pepperdine University Libraries digitizes the early years of the Malibu Times

malibu_timesOn May 2, 1946, the inaugural issue of The Malibu Times reported on several items. Locally, a truck driver was sentenced to 90 days in county jail for driving drunk. National news included mention of an electric window shade featured at the World Inventor’s Expo in Chicago. And Judge John L. Webster, a community leader, heralded the newspaper with these words: “With the advent of the first issue of THE MALIBU TIMES, this western beach and mountain section of Los Angeles county is entering upon a new era. The development planned for Malibu will make it one of the finest, if not THE finest, coastal areas along the entire Pacific slope.”

Pepperdine University Libraries are pleased to announce that the first five years of The Malibu Times are now available online and freely accessible through Pepperdine Digital Collections. Spanning the years 1946 to 1950, these early years of Malibu’s longest-running newspaper are now available, for the first time, as full-text searchable documents. Readers have the option to flip through the paper via an online reader, download a complete PDF of an issue, or highlight a particular article for download or printing (article level segmentation). Click here to access the collection.

The Malibu Times, our coastal community’s premier newspaper, includes sections on the community, Malibu life, news, sports, opinion, obituaries, and entertainment. The paper was founded in 1946 by two Malibu couples: Reeves and Eileen Templeman, and William and Marian Macfadyen. The Templemans carried the paper through the decades until Arnold and Karen York bought the newspaper in 1987. The Malibu Times, still going strong, remains under their ownership today.

Pepperdine University Libraries digitized the first five years of the newspaper as part of a pilot program, and we are actively seeking donations to help us digitize the full run of The Malibu Times. We have, in our Special Collections, the only complete run of this historical newspaper, and digitizing the paper and making it fully searchable online would be an invaluable service to the Malibu community. Click here if you would like to make a contribution.

Many thanks and enjoy.

Introducing the Alumni Memories digital collection

Bernice Pitts receiving her degree at GPC from President Tiner

Bernice Pitts receiving her degree at GPC from President Tiner

Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce the launch of the Alumni Memories Collection, a new digital collection designed to honor the lives of our alumni and the special bond they’ve formed with Pepperdine University. The collection, freely accessible online, is composed of photographs, memorabilia, documents, scrapbooks, correspondence, and other materials donated to Pepperdine University Libraries by alumni of George Pepperdine College and Pepperdine University. The items in this collection, arranged by theme or donor, strive to capture the “Pepperdine experience” while providing a glimpse into the lives of the men and women that call Pepperdine their alma mater.

Christmas Card sent to the Pitts from M. Norvel Young and Family

Christmas Card sent to the Pitts from M. Norvel Young and Family

The flagship donation for the Alumni Memories Collection comes to us from Bernice M. (Carr) Pitts (’49), who provides numerous photographs and documents related to the life she shared with her husband, Carroll Pitts, Jr. (’54). Bernice and Carroll were the first African-American students to live in Normandie Village, the married student housing complex on the original Los Angeles campus of George Pepperdine College. In addition to photos of campus, the collection includes photos and clippings related to the Pitts family, Churches of Christ history in Southern California, and the Pitts’ ongoing relationship with fellow GPC alumnus Los Angeles County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn.

Bernice and Carroll Pitts receive a commemorative certificate from L.A. County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn in 1982

Bernice and Carroll Pitts receive a commemorative certificate from L.A. County Supervisor Kenneth Hahn in 1982

Carroll Pitts, Jr. also earned an M.A. in Religion from Pepperdine College in 1969, producing his thesis A Critical Study of Civil Rights Practices, Attitudes and Responsibilities in Churches of Christ. Throughout his career, Carroll specialized in church administration and personal evangelism, serving as the Minister of the Normandie Church of Christ in Los Angeles for over two decades. Carroll and Bernice traveled widely in support of Christian education, conducting workshops and gospel meetings in places as diverse as South Africa, Egypt, Rome, London, and Haiti. Carroll also taught classes at the annual Pepperdine Bible Lectures in addition to teaching part-time in Pepperdine University’s Religion Division. He passed in 1987. We are very grateful to Bernice for this donation, which we hope will honor his memory and celebrate the achievements they made together through a life devoted to God and Christian education.

If you are an alumnus interested in donating materials to this collection, please contact our Archivist, Katie Richardson at (310) 506-4323 or Katie.Richardson@pepperdine.edu.

T.E. Lawrence Exhibit Opens in Payson Library

This blog post was written by Victoria Collie, Special Collections and University Archives Intern.

An exhibit highlighting the Metcalf Collection of Books on T.E. Lawrence is now open on the main level of Payson Library. Housed in the Special Collections and University Archives, this is the first lawrence bk collectiontime the books have been on display. The book collection and associated Metcalf papers were donated to Pepperdine by Edwards H. Metcalf (1911-2001), a Pepperdine University board member and grandson of millionaire Henry Edwards Huntington. Metcalf was a T.E. Lawrence enthusiast, and helped plan Pepperdine’s T.E. Lawrence Symposium in 1988. The book collection alone contains over 400 books on Lawrence and the Middle East. If you would like to learn more about T.E. Lawrence and the book collection, check out the new InfoGuide! It provides a good starting place for research.

from With Lawrence in Arabia

T.E. Lawrence, 1919

T.E. Lawrence, or “Lawrence of Arabia,” was an extremely intelligent and complex person, who seemed restless until he found his calling in the Middle East fighting alongside the Arab leaders during the Arab Revolt of 1916-1918. He had been familiar with the region before, taking several trips to the area and becoming used to the language and the Arab way of life. His use of guerrilla activities against the Turks during the revolt gained him sudden notoriety. After the war, he ran from his new found fame, using assumed names when enlisting in the Royal Air Force. He died in 1935 at the age of 46. Lawrence wrote a variety of works, including Seven Pillars of Wisdom, which is on display. Also included in the exhibit is his college thesis, Crusader Castles (1936). There are many controversies surrounding Lawrence’s career and life, but he will continue to be the subject of admiration and speculation for years to come.

amman aerodome 1921

Sir Herbert Samuel is pictured in the white hat; Lawrence is pictured to the left of him, and Emir Abdullah is seen on the right. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-DIG-ppmsca-19413