Father Greg Boyle On Bandit’s Story

Father Greg Boyle On Bandit’s Story

Father Greg Boyle has been an advocate for at-risk and gang-involved youth in Los Angeles for over 25 years. In 1992, he founded Homeboy Bakery, with a mission to create an environment that provided training, work experience, and above all, the opportunity for rival gang members to work side by side. The success of the Bakery created the groundwork for additional businesses and services. Today, 12,000 young people a year arrive at Homeboy Industries in search of jobs, counseling, high-school degrees and free tattoo removal. Fr. Boyle’s book, “Tattoos on the Heart” chronicles his years of working with gang members with brilliant, heartbreaking, and hopeful stories. He spoke at Pepperdine University’s Payson Library on April 13, 2011.

Ronald Cox on the KJB in African American Churches

Ronald Cox on the KJB in African American Churches

Ron Cox, associate professor of religion at Pepperdine University, explores the theme “The King James Bible in North American Churches Today.” Cox tells the story of how the King James Bible has ceased to be the bible of choice among North American English speakers. The lecture includes a discussion of the democratization of the Bible through more accessible translations, as well as the consequences of the dethroning of the King James Version in North American churches. This presentation occurred on September 20, 2012 as the closing lecture of the Pepperdine University Libraries’ “Manifold Greatness” exhibition about the historic tome.

Terrence Roberts on Discrimination

Terrence Roberts on Discrimination

Dr. Terrence Roberts, one of the “Little Rock Nine,” speaks at Pepperdine University about civil rights, yesterday and today. Dr. Roberts reflects on the experience of being one of the nine African-American students who volunteered to desegregate Little Rock Central High School in 1957, and shares his perspective and wisdom on such issues as personal choice, compassion, freedom, and responsibility. Drawing from his recent publication Simple Not Easy: Reflections on Community Social Responsibility and Tolerance, the event emphasized a question-and-answer format with the students in attendance. The event took place on January 31, 2013, and was sponsored by Pepperdine University Libraries in partnership with the Black Student Association.