Tag Archives: Internships

Images of the Korean War Exhibit Reception a Success

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Heather and Tommie Williams with archivist Katie Richardson and interns Emily Hansen and Sophie Zhu.

On February 21st the Pepperdine University Libraries celebrated the opening of the exhibition Images of the Korean War: One Soldiers Perspective. The exhibition includes photographs that were taken by Hanson Williams Jr., a 1950 graduate of Pepperdine, who received a photography scholarship to attend the university. Six months after his graduation, he was drafted by the United States Army and was stationed in California for one year before being deployed to Korea to serve as a war photographer. In this capacity, he often photographed soldiers in combat, special events, and visiting dignitaries such as generals, politicians, and celebrities. Williams recalled carrying his personal camera with him every day, and even resorted to developing film in rivers and rice paddies when necessary. In addition to his military duties, Williams tried to get a better understanding of the crowds4country and its people. He would spend his spare time riding his bike into remote locations and photograph such things as local villagers and their farms. Williams spent 13 months in Korea traveling to cities such as Seoul, Incheon, and Taegu.

The exhibit serves as Williams’s visual diary showing his journey from basic training at Fort Ord in Monterey, CA to his time served in Korea. Many of the photos taken by Williams during his spare time in remote villages have never been exhibited before. The materials will be on display on the first floor of Payson Library until April 15th. The exhibit is viewable during library open hours. To view the complete inventory of the collection please visit the findingcrowds6 aid.

For questions about the exhibit or the collection please contact Katie Richardson, Archivist for Special Collections and University Archives, at 310-506-4323 or katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu.

New Exhibit Images of the Korean War: One Soldier’s Perspective Opens this Month at Payson Library

Williams (right) on the front 1952

Hanson (right) on the front, 1952.

Pepperdine University Libraries is pleased to announce a new exhibition highlighting the Korean War photos taken by Hanson Williams Jr., a 1950 graduate of Pepperdine, who received a photography scholarship to attend the university. Six months after his graduation, he was drafted by the United States Army and was stationed in California for one year before being deployed to Korea to serve as a war photographer. In this capacity, he often photographed soldiers in combat, special events, and visiting dignitaries such as generals, politicians, and celebrities. Williams recalled carrying his personal camera with him every day, and even resorted to developing film in rivers and rice paddies when necessary. In addition to his military duties, Williams tried to get a better understanding of the country and its people. He would spend his spare time riding his bike into remote locations and photograph such things as local villagers and their farms. Williams spent 13 months in Korea traveling to cities such as Seoul, Incheon, and Taegu.

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A photo Hanson took while in Korea, 1952.

The exhibit serves as Williams’s visual diary showing his journey from basic training at Fort Ord in Monterey, CA to his time served in Korea. Many of the photos taken by Williams during his spare time in remote villages have never been exhibited before. The materials will be on display on the first floor of Payson Library until April 15th . The exhibit is viewable during library open hours. For questions about the exhibit please contact Katie Richardson, Archivist for Special Collections and University Archives, at 310-506-4323 or katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu.

 A reception for the exhibit will take on February 21st from 12-2. If you are interested in attending the event, please RSVP to Jeanette Woodburn, Director of Library Advancement at 310-506-6785 or Jeanette.Woodburn@pepperdine.edu.

Special thanks to Special Collections and University Archives interns and student workers Emily Hansen, Sophie Zhu, and Candice Erdos for all of their help preparing for this exhibit.

Emily prepping

Emily prepping for the exhibit.

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Candice assisting with exhibit installation.

 

 

Pepperdine Special Collections and University Archives Participates in 9th-Annual Archives Bazaar

For the past 5 years, Pepperdine Special Collections and University Archives has attended and exhibited at the annual Archives Baazar hosted by USC. The Archives Bazaar is a great way for anyone with an interest in the region’s history to find out what local archival repositories have on Southern California history. Pepperdine Special Collections and University Archives Intern, Emily Hansen volunteered at the Pepperdine booth for the day and reflected on her experience below.

A few weekends ago, I was extraordinarily fortunate to attend the Archives Bazaar at the University of Southern California as the Intern for Pepperdine Special Collections and University Archives. On the 25th of October, I walked into the library at USC enchanted by the architecture, but also lost. Eventually I located the Pepperdine table and we set up a display to highlight the archival collections at Pepperdine. Black and white photos of football games long since passed stood among a book on the St. John’s Bible and a coveted Malibu tile. By the end of the day, 225 people had approached our table to share stories and ask questions. To each, we were able to explain Pepperdine’s role in the history of Los Angeles, as well as the actions and events sponsored by Pepperdine Libraries to preserve and expand this history. Being only a few months into my first archives internship, I knew little about the specifics regarding Pepperdine’s history or collections, or even archives in general. However, with each question and answer, I listened to the archivists and learned more and more about what Special Collections has to offer. I was quickly enthralled by stories such as the descriptions of traveling to Malibu by mule before the construction of major roadways, as well as the early days of the Los Angeles campus, when Pepperdine had a champion football team.

As I ventured away from our table to see the full Bazaar, I was amazed by the amount of collections that were represented. Everyone from the Getty Research Center to local heritage clubs, professional organizations, and concert halls were exhibiting the highlights of their collections. People from all stages of life, whether they be amateurs, students or professionals, established a community of a single interest. Alone, each booth focused on a small and specific sliver of Los Angeles, which when put together described the vibrantly detailed and epic history of this city. Finally, at the end of the day I was able to tour the Special Collections department at USC. The size and beauty of the rooms was noteworthy apart from the astounding displays. The Bazaar, and working for Special Collections in general, is a perfect example of the opportunities available for students to gain experience and grow beyond classroom studies. Understanding the history of the school we attend and the city we live in can only enrich our experience here as students. Though we frequently turn to museums of the greater Los Angeles area, the archives and special collections of Pepperdine, or any organization, paint a picture much more relevant and meaningful to our everyday lives in establishing the tradition that surround us.

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Attendees looking at the Pepperdine materials on display.

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Intern, Emily Hansen and Archivist, Katie Richardson at the Pepperdine booth.

For questions about Special Collections and University Archives please contact Katie Richardson at 310-506-4323.

 

Exhibit on the Early Years at George Pepperdine College Opens in Payson Library

This blog post was written by Lindsey Sommer, Special Collections and University Archives Intern.

September 6, 1972, marked the first day of class for students at Pepperdine University in Malibu. Prior to that time, the campus was located in the Vermont Knolls area of Los Angeles, a few miles south of downtown. Students at George Pepperdine College were involved in all sorts of activities. Some wrote for the student newspaper the Graphic, while others were involved in theatre, athletics, fraternities, or sororities. On display are a variety of materials illustrating students at George Pepperdine College from 1937 to the 1960s, participating in these activities, shown through historic photographs, newspaper clippings, documents, scrapbooks, uniforms and memorabilia. The exhibit is divided into four sections: 1. General Student Life, 2. Athletics, 3. Performing Arts, and 4. Sororities and Fraternities.

Section 1: General Student Life

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Homecoming images, such as the one seen here from 1961, show potential homecoming queens arrayed on the lawn at Pepperdine College. Also on display are images of student photographers for the Graphic, and an early Beanie worn by students attending Pepperdine college.

 

 

Section 2: Athletics

pepperdine.contentdm.oclc.orgThe athletics case features Football memorabilia and photographs, featuring men’s NCAA football team (seen here in 1946-1947) as well as an image of the women’s intramural football team. Additionally, on display is an original Pep Club uniform from 1939 and programs from men’s football games.

 

Section 3: Performing Arts

pepperdine.contentdm.oclc.orgAdditionally, on view are several programs and historic photographs showing student participation in the fine arts, such as an image from the 1959 production of the King and I, which can be seen with the original program. Viewers may also see original art show announcements and images of the Pepperdine College singing group the Singing Travelers.

 

Section 4: Sororities and Fraternities.

pepperdine.contentdm.oclc.orgFinally, a selection of memorabilia and photographs show students participating in Greek life at Pepperdine College, with scrapbooks, rush pins, and fraternity mugs. For example, in the photograph to the left, pledges can be seen pushing marbles down a corridor in Baxter Hall in 1942.

 

For further questions about the exhibit or internships in Special Collections and University Archives please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or 310-506-4323.

 

Intern to Process Donald G. Ingalls Collection of Television Scripts

Tanner Potts is a senior at the University of the South and is double majoring in History and American Studies. Tanner will be working in Special Collections and University Archives over an eight week period this summer.

Tanner’s first project will be to process the Donald G. Ingalls Collection. Ingalls was a prolific film and television writer and producer with over 35 years of experience. During his Hollywood career, he wrote for many shows including Have Gun, Will Travel, Bonanza, The Big Valley, The Virginian, Gunsmoke, Star Trek, and Fantasy Island, among others. He also wrote for the feature film, Airport 1975.

The collection consists mostly of scripts from the shows that Ingalls worked on. The project includes arranging and describing materials, writing a finding aid, and adding descriptive information to Archivists’ Toolkit. The finding aid will be published on the Online Archive of California when Tanner is done.

For further questions about internships or Special Collections and University Archives holdings please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or 310-506-4323.

Two New University Archives Collections Ready for Use

Special Collections and University Archives volunteer, Amber DelaCruz, recently processed and created finding aids for two archival collections.

The Pepperdine University Archives Oral History Collection consists of over 100 oral history interviews with former faculty, staff, donors, distinguished guests, students, and other individuals associated with Pepperdine University. The interviews range in date from 1964 to present.

The Pepperdine University Campus Planning and Construction Collection consists mainly of materials relating to the planning and construction of the Pepperdine University campus in Malibu.  In 1969, the Rindge and Adamson family gave Pepperdine 138 acres of land in the Santa Monica Mountains. Subsequently, other gifts and purchases of adjoining parcels increased the size of the campus to 650 acres overlooking the Pacific Ocean. In February of 1970, Ronald Reagan, architect William Pereira, and Pepperdine administrators announced plans for the new campus and launched the $63-million fund campaign to finance it and set up an endowment.

The Malibu campus opened with three major academic complexes: the Huntsinger Academic Complex, the Murchison Science Center, and the Tyler Campus Center.  Materials include master plan files, maps, correspondence, architectural plans, drawings, and photographs associated with the construction of campus buildings and landscaped areas.  The materials range in date from 1968 to 1999.

Do you have a question about a collection? Contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or 310-506-4232.

Welcome Special Collections and University Archives Interns!

3 interns and 1 volunteer joined the Special Collections and University Archives team this semester. Each student is assigned a unique project that is tailored to their interests, desired learning outcomes, and departmental needs.

Lindsey Sommer is a second year graduate student in the UCLA MLIS program. She is processing the papers of Shirley Roper. Roper served as an assistant to numerous Pepperdine presidents including Benton, Davenport, White, and Young, as well as assistant to Provost Adrian. Roper worked at Pepperdine from 1963 to 2012. Her records play an integral role in documenting the history of Pepperdine through her near 50 years at the university and are a valuable asset to the university archives. In addition to processing the collection, Lindsey will create a finding aid and a MARC record for the collection.

Kendal Copeland is a junior at Pepperdine majoring in History. Kendal will enhance the finding aids of the Pepperdine Associates Records and the Pepperdine University Convocations, Founder’s Day and Presidential Inaugurations Collection. Kendal will describe the collections in greater detail, adding folder level description to Archivists’ Toolkit and updating the finding aids. She will also take part in an important preservation activity to preserve the student newspaper the Graphic.

Sophie Zhu is a junior at Pepperdine majoring in History. Sophie is processing a recent acquisition from Tommie Williams, wife of Hanson Williams, who served as a photographer at Pepperdine College. The new acquisition focuses solely on Williams’ time during the Korean War. Williams took many photos while in the military, stationed in Korea from 1951-1952. She will update the finding aid for this collection, Mylar, and organize the photographs.

Amber DelaCruz is a recent graduate of San Jose State University with a MLIS degree. Amber has worked on several projects including creating a finding aid for the Pepperdine Oral Histories Collection and also updating the Gavin McLeod Collection of Scripts. Currently, she is processing the Pepperdine University Campus Planning and Construction Collection.

Thanks interns and volunteers for all of your hard work!

Interested in interning in Special Collections and University Archives? Contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310)506-4323.

Two New Film and Television Collections Ready for Use

This past fall, Special Collections and University Archives Intern, Beth McDonald, processed and created finding aids for two of our newest acquisitions the Michael D. “Micky” Moore Papers and the Chuck Waters Papers. Moore and Waters made their careers in the entertainment industry in very different ways. Moore was an actor and director while Waters is a stuntman and actor. The two men worked on several projects together and were close friends.Moore on the set of Pollyanna in 1920

Moore began his film career as a child actor on the silent screen and between 1917 and 1929, he acted in over 40 films. Moore worked with such silent screen stars as Mary Pickford, Jack Holt, Gloria Swanson, Lillian Gish, Conrad Nagel and Tom Mix.

Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, Moore worked as a Prop Man before he was offered the opportunity to move in to production as an assistant director. He jumped at the chance. As assistant director, Moore worked for some of the most famous directors of the day, including his mentor, Cecil B. DeMille, on DeMille’s last film as a director, The Ten Commandments.

From the 1960s on, Moore became well-known as a reliable and confident secoMoore-Patton002  nd unit directMoore-Patton001or with a knack for action sequences. He worked on some of the most famous movies of the twentieth century, including Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Patton, Rooster Cogburn, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Moore retired in 2000 after wrapping his final movie, the Walt Disney picture 102 Dalmatians.

The collection includes photographs, scripts, storyboards, letters, videos, movie memorabilia, and materials from his memoir.

Chuck Waters is an American stuntman and actor who has worked on more than 130 films. Even as a child, he was known for his adventurous nature: as early as five years old, he could be found climbing on the roof of his house and jumping to a nearby tree to get down. In the 1960s, waters decided to move to Hollywood to pursue a career in the entertainment industry.  Waters eventually connected with well-known stuntman, Paul Stader, who owned a boxing gym in Santa Monica where he trained up and coming stuntmen. Chuck began training with Stader and in 1965, after only 9 months of training, was recommended to take Stader’s place on a job as a scuba diver on the TV series Honey West starring Ann Francis.

Honky Tonk Freeway 1981Every Which Way But Loose Eastwood rehearshing a fight scene with WatersIn the 1970s, Waters career took off. He performed stunts in major films such as High Plains Drifter, The Exorcist (crashing through a window and down 75 steps as Jason Miller’s stunt double), The Deer Hunter, and Apocalypse Now. Over the course of his career, Waters has worked with many of the top names in Hollywood, including George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, William Friedkin, and Francis Ford Coppola. He has worked with actors such as Harrison Ford, Martin Sheen, Sean Penn, Robert De Niro, and Sean Connery. One of his longest working relationships is with actor/director Clint Eastwood, with whom Waters has done 13 films. Additional movies Waters has worked on include: Raiders of the Lost Ark, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, National Lampoon’s European Vacation, Flubber, Every Which Way But Loose, Flags of Our Fathers, and Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl.

The collection includes scripts, notes, photographs, stunt reels, articles, and ephemera relating to Waters’ career in the stunt industry.

In November, Chuck Waters, his wife Charlotte, and Moore’s daughters Sandy and Tricia, meet with Special Collections and University Archives staff.

photo 2For questions about the collections, please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu or (310) 506-4323.

Special Collections Intern Processes Two Collections

Kendal Copeland, a junior at Pepperdine, interned in Special Collections and University Archives during the fall semester. Kendal was responsible for enhancing the finding aid of the Pepperdine University Athletics Records and the Pepperdine College Freedom Forum Records. She described both collections in greater detail, adding folder level description to Archivists’ Toolkit and updating the finding aids. Kendal had this to say about her experience interning in the department:

football60004This semester I had the opportunity to intern in Special Collections and University Archives. The experience was a lot of fun, interesting, and educational. I learned all about the hard work that goes into maintaining, organizing, and preserving a collection.I worked on two collections; the Pepperdine University Athletics Records and the Pepperdine Freedom Forum Records.

While processing the athletics records, I was able to see the evolution of sports at Pepperdine from the late 1930’s to the present. Through articles, programs, newspaper clippings, videos, and photographs I had the opportunity to see how sports became more integrated. In addition, I was able to see the progress of women athletes over the years.

One thing I really enjoyed was being able to read and look at photos of the Pepperdine football team from its beginning to end (1946-1961).  I was even able to box a 1946 football lettermen jacket. The evolution of uniforms and how much they have changed was fun to see. I think it was for the best that men’s basketball uniforms have evolved the way they have.

A photograph I found very interesting was of a women’s football team here at Pepperdine. The caption on the back says “Women’s Football, 1960.”

football60003When I finished working on the athletics records, I processed a small collection on the Pepperdine College Freedom Forums. The Pepperdine College Freedom Forum was a three day seminar on promoting and defending American values co-sponsored by Pepperdine College and the National Education Program held annually on campus from 1959 to 1971. I was amazed at the amount of guest speakers over the years that came out to the forums. It was very insightful to read the speeches because I got a chance in a small way to experience what times were like during that time period.

For further information about viewing the collections or for information on the types of internships available with Special Collections and University Archives please contact Katie Richardson at katie.richardson@pepperdine.edu

T.E. Lawrence Exhibit Opens in Payson Library

This blog post was written by Victoria Collie, Special Collections and University Archives Intern.

An exhibit highlighting the Metcalf Collection of Books on T.E. Lawrence is now open on the main level of Payson Library. Housed in the Special Collections and University Archives, this is the first lawrence bk collectiontime the books have been on display. The book collection and associated Metcalf papers were donated to Pepperdine by Edwards H. Metcalf (1911-2001), a Pepperdine University board member and grandson of millionaire Henry Edwards Huntington. Metcalf was a T.E. Lawrence enthusiast, and helped plan Pepperdine’s T.E. Lawrence Symposium in 1988. The book collection alone contains over 400 books on Lawrence and the Middle East. If you would like to learn more about T.E. Lawrence and the book collection, check out the new InfoGuide! It provides a good starting place for research.

from With Lawrence in Arabia

T.E. Lawrence, 1919
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T.E. Lawrence, or “Lawrence of Arabia,” was an extremely intelligent and complex person, who seemed restless until he found his calling in the Middle East fighting alongside the Arab leaders during the Arab Revolt of 1916-1918. He had been familiar with the region before, taking several trips to the area and becoming used to the language and the Arab way of life. His use of guerrilla activities against the Turks during the revolt gained him sudden notoriety. After the war, he ran from his new found fame, using assumed names when enlisting in the Royal Air Force. He died in 1935 at the age of 46. Lawrence wrote a variety of works, including Seven Pillars of Wisdom, which is on display. Also included in the exhibit is his college thesis, Crusader Castles (1936). There are many controversies surrounding Lawrence’s career and life, but he will continue to be the subject of admiration and speculation for years to come.

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Sir Herbert Samuel is pictured in the white hat; Lawrence is pictured to the left of him, and Emir Abdullah is seen on the right. Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-DIG-ppmsca-19413