Lori Anne Ferrell: “The Texts Have Shifted Place”

Lori Anne Ferrell: “The Texts Have Shifted Place”

Lori Anne Ferrell, chair of English and professor of early modern history and literature at Claremont Graduate University, discusses her book The Bible and the People, which she describes as a “cultural biography” of the “restless, peripatetic text that is the Christian Bible.” Dr. Ferrell’s talk was in conjunction with the traveling exhibition “Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible,” which visited Pepperdine University in 2012. She spoke at Pepperdine University Libraries in Malibu, California on Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012.

Nelson Oliver on The Future of The Red Cape

Nelson Oliver on The Future of The Red Cape

Director and screenwriter Nelson Oliver speaks at Pepperdine University Libraries following the premiere of his original short film, The Red Cape, on February 21, 2013. The Red Cape chronicles a little known chapter in American history: the 1898 Wilmington Race Riot, which stands as the only coup d’état, or violent overthrow of a government, in United States history. The incident was a springboard for the Jim Crow laws that disenfranchised black citizens through the 1960s. Oliver appears here in discussion with Dr. Joi Carr, Assistant Professor of English at Pepperdine, to discuss the continuing resonance of this story in American civil right history. This event was cosponsored by the Black Student Association.

Nelson Oliver on the African American Dialect

Nelson Oliver on the African American Dialect

Director and screenwriter Nelson Oliver speaks at Pepperdine University Libraries following the premiere of his original short film, The Red Cape, on February 21, 2013. The Red Cape chronicles a little known chapter in American history: the 1898 Wilmington Race Riot, which stands as the only coup d’état, or violent overthrow of a government, in United States history. The incident was a springboard for the Jim Crow laws that disenfranchised black citizens through the 1960s. Oliver appears here in discussion with Dr. Joi Carr, Assistant Professor of English at Pepperdine, to discuss the continuing resonance of this story in American civil right history. This event was cosponsored by the Black Student Association.

Nelson Oliver on Bigotry’s Continuing Influence

Nelson Oliver on Bigotry’s Continuing Influence

Director and screenwriter Nelson Oliver speaks at Pepperdine University Libraries following the premiere of his original short film, The Red Cape, on February 21, 2013. The Red Cape chronicles a little known chapter in American history: the 1898 Wilmington Race Riot, which stands as the only coup d’état, or violent overthrow of a government, in United States history. The incident was a springboard for the Jim Crow laws that disenfranchised black citizens through the 1960s. Oliver appears here in discussion with Dr. Joi Carr, Assistant Professor of English at Pepperdine, to discuss the continuing resonance of this story in American civil right history. This event was cosponsored by the Black Student Association.

Terrence Roberts: Is there Race?

Terrence Roberts: Is there Race?

Dr. Terrence Roberts, one of the “Little Rock Nine,” speaks at Pepperdine University about civil rights, yesterday and today. Dr. Roberts reflects on the experience of being one of the nine African-American students who volunteered to desegregate Little Rock Central High School in 1957, and shares his perspective and wisdom on such issues as personal choice, compassion, freedom, and responsibility. Drawing from his recent publication Simple Not Easy: Reflections on Community Social Responsibility and Tolerance, the event emphasized a question-and-answer format with the students in attendance. The event took place on January 31, 2013, and was sponsored by Pepperdine University Libraries in partnership with the Black Student Association.

Terrence Roberts on Affirmative Action

Terrence Roberts on Affirmative Action

Dr. Terrence Roberts, one of the “Little Rock Nine,” speaks at Pepperdine University about civil rights, yesterday and today. Dr. Roberts reflects on the experience of being one of the nine African-American students who volunteered to desegregate Little Rock Central High School in 1957, and shares his perspective and wisdom on such issues as personal choice, compassion, freedom, and responsibility. Drawing from his recent publication Simple Not Easy: Reflections on Community Social Responsibility and Tolerance, the event emphasized a question-and-answer format with the students in attendance. The event took place on January 31, 2013, and was sponsored by Pepperdine University Libraries in partnership with the Black Student Association.